. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 88 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. all burrow in the ground, run with very great speed, bite with nian'ellous severity, and associate in considerable numbers. As a general fact, they are considered as great dainties, and when properly prepared, may be ranked among the standing luxuries of their country.. LAND CRAB. As the Violet Land Crab of Jamaica (Gecarcinus ruricola), is the most familiar of these creatures, we will take it as our first example of the burrowing cr

- Image ID: PG2G3C
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 88 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. all burrow in the ground, run with very great speed, bite with nian'ellous severity, and associate in considerable numbers. As a general fact, they are considered as great dainties, and when properly prepared, may be ranked among the standing luxuries of their country.. LAND CRAB. As the Violet Land Crab of Jamaica (Gecarcinus ruricola), is the most familiar of these creatures, we will take it as our first example of the burrowing cr
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG2G3C
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 88 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. all burrow in the ground, run with very great speed, bite with nian'ellous severity, and associate in considerable numbers. As a general fact, they are considered as great dainties, and when properly prepared, may be ranked among the standing luxuries of their country.. LAND CRAB. As the Violet Land Crab of Jamaica (Gecarcinus ruricola), is the most familiar of these creatures, we will take it as our first example of the burrowing crustacea. This species, which is sometimes called the Black Crab, and sometimes the Toulourou, is exceedingly variable in its colouring, sometimes black, some- times blue, and sometimes spotted. Whatever may be the colour, some tinge of blue is always to be found, so that the name of Violet Crab is the most appropriate of the three. Wherever the Land Crab makes its home, the ground is filled. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

Similar stock images