. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 622 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS.. Termite Cell. Througli these passages the workers are continually passing, some entering with empty jaws, and others emerging, each hold- ing between its mandibles an egg, which it is conveying to the nurseries. So rapidly are the eggs laid, that the workers are fully employed in carrying them out and placing them under the charge of the nurses. The contrast in size between the workers and the queen can easily be seen by reference

- Image ID: RDA372
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 622 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS.. Termite Cell. Througli these passages the workers are continually passing, some entering with empty jaws, and others emerging, each hold- ing between its mandibles an egg, which it is conveying to the nurseries. So rapidly are the eggs laid, that the workers are fully employed in carrying them out and placing them under the charge of the nurses. The contrast in size between the workers and the queen can easily be seen by reference
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDA372
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 622 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS.. Termite Cell. Througli these passages the workers are continually passing, some entering with empty jaws, and others emerging, each hold- ing between its mandibles an egg, which it is conveying to the nurseries. So rapidly are the eggs laid, that the workers are fully employed in carrying them out and placing them under the charge of the nurses. The contrast in size between the workers and the queen can easily be seen by reference to the illustration. At Fig. 5 is shown the queen, and in the right hand of Fig. 1 is seen one of the workers passing through the tunnel. None but the workers can pass through.so small an aperture, for the fighters or soldiers are of very much greater size than the workers, as may be seen at Fig. 4. _ _ ' The queen, however, is necessarily very much reduced in size, as, if she had been drawn of her full dimensions, she would have occupied the whole length of the drawing. Before she is im- mured in the royal cell she is by no means a large insect, the ab-. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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