. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 620 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. home, but enjoyed the advantage of the regular and high tem- perature which proceeded from the body of the sitting hen, and which was admirably adapted for the well-being of her young family. The last example of a remarkable Mouse-nest is that which is figured in the .accompanying illustration, and which was drawn from the actual object. A number of empty bottles had been stowed away upon a shelf, and among them was found one which

- Image ID: RDA375
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 620 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. home, but enjoyed the advantage of the regular and high tem- perature which proceeded from the body of the sitting hen, and which was admirably adapted for the well-being of her young family. The last example of a remarkable Mouse-nest is that which is figured in the .accompanying illustration, and which was drawn from the actual object. A number of empty bottles had been stowed away upon a shelf, and among them was found one which
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Image ID: RDA375
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 620 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. home, but enjoyed the advantage of the regular and high tem- perature which proceeded from the body of the sitting hen, and which was admirably adapted for the well-being of her young family. The last example of a remarkable Mouse-nest is that which is figured in the .accompanying illustration, and which was drawn from the actual object. A number of empty bottles had been stowed away upon a shelf, and among them was found one which was tenanted by a Mouse. The little creature had considered that the bottle would. Mouae-nest in a Bottle. afford a suitable home for her young, and had therefore conveyed into it a quantity of bedding, which she made into a nest. The bottle was filled with the nest, and the eccentric architect had taken the precaution to leave a round hole corresponding to the neck of the bottle. In this remarkable domicile the young were placed; and it is a fact worthy of notice that no attempt had been made to shut out the light. Nothing would have been easier than to have formed the cavity at the under side, so that the soft materials of the nest would exclude the light; but the Mouse had simply formed a comfortable hollow for her young, and therein she had placed her offspring. It is therefore evident that the Mouse has no fear of light, but that it only chooses darkness as a means of safety for its young.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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