. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 600 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. It is hardly possible to overrate the wonderful varieties of form that are assumed by the nests of insects—varieties so bold and so startling that few would believe in the possibility of their existence without ocular demonstration. No rule seems to be observed in them; at all events, no rule has as yet been discov- ered by which their formation is guided, neither has any conjec- ture been formed as to the reason for the remarkable

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. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 600 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. It is hardly possible to overrate the wonderful varieties of form that are assumed by the nests of insects—varieties so bold and so startling that few would believe in the possibility of their existence without ocular demonstration. No rule seems to be observed in them; at all events, no rule has as yet been discov- ered by which their formation is guided, neither has any conjec- ture been formed as to the reason for the remarkable
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Image ID: PFYPFN
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 600 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. It is hardly possible to overrate the wonderful varieties of form that are assumed by the nests of insects—varieties so bold and so startling that few would believe in the possibility of their existence without ocular demonstration. No rule seems to be observed in them; at all events, no rule has as yet been discov- ered by which their formation is guided, neither has any conjec- ture been formed as to the reason for the remarkable forms which they assume. Perhaps, of all the nests in the splendid collection of the Brit- ish Museum, there are none that cause so much surprise as the wonderful group which is represented in this illustration. Many. Apoica. persons pass through the room, and even take some notice of the various nests with which they are surrounded, but they seldom notice the peculiarities of this group until pointed out to them. When, however, their attention is directed toward it, they never. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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