. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 548 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. reeds and sedges will always induce it to recommence its little song. The remarkably beautiful nest which is here shown is built by one of the British birds, but is not often found, on account of the localities where it is placed.. NE5n' OF THE REm WARBLER. The architect of this nest is the Eeed Wakbler {Salicaria [or Curruca arundinacea). It is a pretty little bird, bright brown above, yellow-brown below. In some respects it resem

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. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 548 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. reeds and sedges will always induce it to recommence its little song. The remarkably beautiful nest which is here shown is built by one of the British birds, but is not often found, on account of the localities where it is placed.. NE5n' OF THE REm WARBLER. The architect of this nest is the Eeed Wakbler {Salicaria [or Curruca arundinacea). It is a pretty little bird, bright brown above, yellow-brown below. In some respects it resem
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDFFE1
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 548 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. reeds and sedges will always induce it to recommence its little song. The remarkably beautiful nest which is here shown is built by one of the British birds, but is not often found, on account of the localities where it is placed.. NE5n' OF THE REm WARBLER. The architect of this nest is the Eeed Wakbler {Salicaria [or Curruca\ arundinacea). It is a pretty little bird, bright brown above, yellow-brown below. In some respects it resembles the sedge warbler, but does not possess the remarkable wedge- shaped tail of that bird. K. Mudie, in his History of British Birds, offers the following suggestion respecting this difference of form. When treating of the sedge warbler, he remarks that the slender head, pointed bill, and wedge-shaped tail are useful to the bird by enabling it to glide between the tall aquatic plants among which it resides and finds its food. Of the Eeed War- bler ho writes as follows :— " That the bird is not adapted for so many situations as the sedge bird, might be inferred from the different form of the tail,. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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