. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 442 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. surface, and are quite inconspicuous. On examination, these prominences are seen to be composed of sti£f silken threads, which converge to a point, precisely like those which guard .the entrance of the emperor moth's cocoon, so that any inhabitant can crawl out, but no enemy can crawl in. This nest, like the preceding, may be seen in the museum at Oxford.. SMALL ETIMINE MOTH. There is a very pretty, very interesting, and very destru

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. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 442 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. surface, and are quite inconspicuous. On examination, these prominences are seen to be composed of sti£f silken threads, which converge to a point, precisely like those which guard .the entrance of the emperor moth's cocoon, so that any inhabitant can crawl out, but no enemy can crawl in. This nest, like the preceding, may be seen in the museum at Oxford.. SMALL ETIMINE MOTH. There is a very pretty, very interesting, and very destru
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDFFH4
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 442 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. surface, and are quite inconspicuous. On examination, these prominences are seen to be composed of sti£f silken threads, which converge to a point, precisely like those which guard .the entrance of the emperor moth's cocoon, so that any inhabitant can crawl out, but no enemy can crawl in. This nest, like the preceding, may be seen in the museum at Oxford.. SMALL ETIMINE MOTH. There is a very pretty, very interesting, and very destructive insect, called by entomologists the Small Ekmine Moth {Yjoono- mejda padella), which is very plentiful in this country, and by gardeners is thought to be much too plentiful. It can easily be recognised by its long narrow wings, the upper pair of which are soft silvery, or satiny white, spotted with black, and the lower pair dark brown. The expanse of the spread wings is about three quarters of an inch. In its winged and pupal states the insect is perfectly harmless, but in its larval condition it becomes a terrible pest. Most cater- pillars wage war singly on the foliage, and though they do much damage, their ravages are conducted in a desultory manner. The Small Ermines, however, band themselves together in hosts,. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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