. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 352 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. This is one of the species which are tolerably common in certain localities, but as they are very local, may be reckoned among the varieties. Mr. F. Smith, in his " Catalogue of the British Yespidse," mentions that it has been taken in several parts of Hampshire, Berkshire, near Weybiidge, and has been found plentifully at Sunninghill. Probably, the rarity or fre- quency of this species, as is the case with many others, de

- Image ID: RDFFXM
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 352 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. This is one of the species which are tolerably common in certain localities, but as they are very local, may be reckoned among the varieties. Mr. F. Smith, in his " Catalogue of the British Yespidse," mentions that it has been taken in several parts of Hampshire, Berkshire, near Weybiidge, and has been found plentifully at Sunninghill. Probably, the rarity or fre- quency of this species, as is the case with many others, de
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDFFXM
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 352 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. This is one of the species which are tolerably common in certain localities, but as they are very local, may be reckoned among the varieties. Mr. F. Smith, in his " Catalogue of the British Yespidse," mentions that it has been taken in several parts of Hampshire, Berkshire, near Weybiidge, and has been found plentifully at Sunninghill. Probably, the rarity or fre- quency of this species, as is the case with many others, depends greatly on the eyes which look after it. BUHENES ASD ARELEKA. This little wasp constructs small globular ceUs of mud, and fastens them to the stems of various plants, the common heath being the greatest favourite, so that heath-covered commons are likely to afford specimens of the nest and its architect. Each nest contains only a single cell, and is only intended to rear a single occupant. The wasp is a very useful insect, as it pro- visions its nest with the larvae of small lepidoptera, each Eumenes grub recLuiring a tolerably large supply of caterpillars. As is the case with so many insects, the Eumenes is greatly subject to the attacks of parasites, which contrive to deposit their eggs in the larvae in spite of the hard mud walls of the cell. Mr. Smith mentions that he has bred from the nest of the Eumenes, an ichneumon fly belonging to the genus Cryjptvs.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

Similar stock images