. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 34 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. the Rat hides itself under tlieir protection, and eats away their tender shoots. Like the mole, the Gopher throws up little hillocks at irre- gular intervals, sometimes twenty or thirty feet apart, and sometimes crowded closely together. The nest of the Gopher is made in a burrow constructed expressly for the purpose, and is placed in a small globular chamber about eight inches in diameter. The bed on which the mother and her young r

- Image ID: PG2G6C
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 34 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. the Rat hides itself under tlieir protection, and eats away their tender shoots. Like the mole, the Gopher throws up little hillocks at irre- gular intervals, sometimes twenty or thirty feet apart, and sometimes crowded closely together. The nest of the Gopher is made in a burrow constructed expressly for the purpose, and is placed in a small globular chamber about eight inches in diameter. The bed on which the mother and her young r
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Image ID: PG2G6C
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 34 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. the Rat hides itself under tlieir protection, and eats away their tender shoots. Like the mole, the Gopher throws up little hillocks at irre- gular intervals, sometimes twenty or thirty feet apart, and sometimes crowded closely together. The nest of the Gopher is made in a burrow constructed expressly for the purpose, and is placed in a small globular chamber about eight inches in diameter. The bed on which the mother and her young repose. CAN.VDA POUCHED RAT. (Plan of BuTTQw ) is made of dried herbage and fur plucked from the body. This chamber is the point from which a great number of pas- sages radiate, and from these other tunnels are driven. These radiating burrows evidently serve two purposes, enabling the animal to escape in any direction when alarmed, and serving to conduct it to its feeding grounds. In two instances where the Gophers had entered a garden, their tunnels were traced throughout the greater part of their extfiut, and were foimd to be driven at an average depth of a foot or eighteen inches below the surface, except when they. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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