. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 328 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. It is about as large as a lark, and is a bold-looking bird, rather slenderly built, and standing very upright. Its color is warm brown. It is very active, running and walking very fast, and is much on the wing, though its flights are not of long duration, consisting chiefly of short flittings from bush to bush in search of insects. It generally haunts the banks of South American rivers, and is a fearless little bird, not being alarm

- Image ID: RDA3CE
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 328 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. It is about as large as a lark, and is a bold-looking bird, rather slenderly built, and standing very upright. Its color is warm brown. It is very active, running and walking very fast, and is much on the wing, though its flights are not of long duration, consisting chiefly of short flittings from bush to bush in search of insects. It generally haunts the banks of South American rivers, and is a fearless little bird, not being alarm
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Image ID: RDA3CE
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 328 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. It is about as large as a lark, and is a bold-looking bird, rather slenderly built, and standing very upright. Its color is warm brown. It is very active, running and walking very fast, and is much on the wing, though its flights are not of long duration, consisting chiefly of short flittings from bush to bush in search of insects. It generally haunts the banks of South American rivers, and is a fearless little bird, not being alarmed even at the presence of man. The male has a hard, shrill note, and the fe- male has a cry of somewhat similar sound, but much weaker. The chief interest of this bird centres in its nest, which is a truly remarkable example of bird architecture. The material of which it is made is principally mud or clay obtained from the river banks, but it is strengthened and stiffened by the admixture of grass, vegetable fibres, and stems of various plants. The heat. Oven Bird. of the sun is sufficient to harden it, and when it has been thor- oughly dried, it is so strong that it seems more like the handi- work of some novice at pottery than a veritable nest constructed. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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