. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 176 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. beetle within a curiously-woven cell. This beetle belongs to the genus Ehagium. As long as the insect remains in its larval con- dition, it diifers in little from the wood-boring larva. When, however, it is about to change into the pupal state, it makes a. BIIAOIUM, ETC. beautifuUy-worked cocoon in which it spends the time which intervenes between the change into the pupa and that into the perfect insect. The cocoon is made of woody

- Image ID: PG2FYY
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 176 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. beetle within a curiously-woven cell. This beetle belongs to the genus Ehagium. As long as the insect remains in its larval con- dition, it diifers in little from the wood-boring larva. When, however, it is about to change into the pupal state, it makes a. BIIAOIUM, ETC. beautifuUy-worked cocoon in which it spends the time which intervenes between the change into the pupa and that into the perfect insect. The cocoon is made of woody
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG2FYY
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. 176 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. beetle within a curiously-woven cell. This beetle belongs to the genus Ehagium. As long as the insect remains in its larval con- dition, it diifers in little from the wood-boring larva. When, however, it is about to change into the pupal state, it makes a. BIIAOIUM, ETC. beautifuUy-worked cocoon in which it spends the time which intervenes between the change into the pupa and that into the perfect insect. The cocoon is made of woody fibres, which the larva bites and tears away, and the hollow in which the cocoon rests is usually in the bark. The fibres are rather long and narrow, as may be seen by reference to the illustration, which represents the cocoon and insect of the natural size. As the woody fibres are of a pale-straw colour, the cocoon presents an agreeable contrast to the sombre hues of the bark in which it is bedded. When the insect has attained its perfect form, its first care is to escape from the dwelling which has served it so well through its long period of helplessness; and by means of the sharp and powerful jaws with which it is furnished, it gnaws a hole through the side of the cocoon and so escapes into the open air. In the illustration, the beetle is represented in the act of making its way through the cocoon. The magnificent insect which is known to entomologists as the Harlequin Beetle (A crociwus longimanus) also belongs to the. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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