. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 154 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. the Cerceris generally selects the very beietlea which are most in- jurious to vegetation, such as the various weevils and the turnip- fleas. Mr. Smith is of opinion that the shells of the beetles are softened by the dampness of the ground in which they lie. In the accompanying illustration are shown the nests of two common species of British Humble-bee.. Bombua Terrestris. Bombua Lapidaiius. Both these species are burrowers, and so

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. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 154 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. the Cerceris generally selects the very beietlea which are most in- jurious to vegetation, such as the various weevils and the turnip- fleas. Mr. Smith is of opinion that the shells of the beetles are softened by the dampness of the ground in which they lie. In the accompanying illustration are shown the nests of two common species of British Humble-bee.. Bombua Terrestris. Bombua Lapidaiius. Both these species are burrowers, and so
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Image ID: PFYGXA
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. 154 HOMES WITHOUT HANDS. the Cerceris generally selects the very beietlea which are most in- jurious to vegetation, such as the various weevils and the turnip- fleas. Mr. Smith is of opinion that the shells of the beetles are softened by the dampness of the ground in which they lie. In the accompanying illustration are shown the nests of two common species of British Humble-bee.. Bombua Terrestris. Bombua Lapidaiius. Both these species are burrowers, and sometimes make their nests at a considerable depth beneath the surface. The common Humble-bee {Bomhus terrestris) generally makes its subterranean house in the side of some bank, and the nest is usually found at a depth of a foot or eighteen inches. Sometimes, however, in places where the soil is light and friable, the nest has been found at a very great depth from the surface, so that a perpendicular shaft of five feet in length has been required before the nest. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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