Highgate Cemetery London

- Image ID: E1JN2K
Highgate Cemetery London
Rik Hamilton / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: E1JN2K
Highgate Cemetery is a place of burial in north London, England. It is designated Grade I on the English Heritage Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. It is divided into two parts, the East and West cemetery. There are approximately 170,000 people buried in around 53,000 graves at Highgate Cemetery. The cemetery in its original form – the north-western wooded area – opened in 1839, as part of a plan to provide seven large, modern cemeteries, known as the "Magnificent Seven", around the outside of central London. The initial design was by architect and entrepreneur Stephen Geary. On Monday 20 May 1839, Highgate Cemetery was dedicated to St. James by the Right Reverend Charles Blomfield, Lord Bishop of London. Fifteen acres were consecrated for the use of the Church of England, and two acres set aside for Dissenters. The first burial was Elizabeth Jackson of Little Windmill Street, Soho, on 26 May. The Victorian attitude to death and its presentation led to the creation of a wealth of Gothic tombs and buildings. In 1854 the area to the east of the original area across Swains Lane was bought to form the eastern part of the cemetery. The cemetery's grounds are full of trees, shrubbery and wild flowers, most of which have been planted and grown without human influence. The Egyptian Avenue and the Circle of Lebanon (topped by a huge Cedar of Lebanon) feature tombs, vaults and winding paths dug into hillsides. For its protection, the oldest section, which holds an impressive collection of Victorian mausoleums and gravestones, plus elaborately carved tombs, allows admission only in tour groups. The eastern section, which contains a mix of Victorian and modern statuary. The tomb of Karl Marx, the Egyptian Avenue and the Columbarium are Grade I listed buildings. Highgate Cemetery was featured in the popular media from the 1960s to the late 1980s for its so-called occult past, particularly as being the alleged site of the "Highgate Vampire".
Location: Highgate Cemetery is a place of burial in north London, England.