Harper's New Monthly Magazine Volume 109 June to November 1904 . rd, no less than in heightof prophetic power, in depth of recon-ciling and atoning inspiration, he is ex-celled by iEschylus: though surely, onthe latter score, by zEschylus alone. Butif the unique and marvellous power whichat the close of the Oresteia leaves us im-pressed with a crowming and final senseof high spiritual calm and austere con-solation in face of all the mystery of suf-fering and of sin—if this supreme giftof the imaginative reason was no moreshared by Shakespeare than by any poetor prophet or teacher of Hebrew ori

Harper's New Monthly Magazine Volume 109 June to November 1904 . rd, no less than in heightof prophetic power, in depth of recon-ciling and atoning inspiration, he is ex-celled by iEschylus: though surely, onthe latter score, by zEschylus alone. Butif the unique and marvellous power whichat the close of the Oresteia leaves us im-pressed with a crowming and final senseof high spiritual calm and austere con-solation in face of all the mystery of suf-fering and of sin—if this supreme giftof the imaginative reason was no moreshared by Shakespeare than by any poetor prophet or teacher of Hebrew ori Stock Photo
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Harper's New Monthly Magazine Volume 109 June to November 1904 . rd, no less than in heightof prophetic power, in depth of recon-ciling and atoning inspiration, he is ex-celled by iEschylus: though surely, onthe latter score, by zEschylus alone. Butif the unique and marvellous power whichat the close of the Oresteia leaves us im-pressed with a crowming and final senseof high spiritual calm and austere con-solation in face of all the mystery of suf-fering and of sin—if this supreme giftof the imaginative reason was no moreshared by Shakespeare than by any poetor prophet or teacher of Hebrew origin, it was his and his alone to set before usthe tragic problem of character andevent, of all action and all passion, allevil and all good, all natural joy andsorrow and chance and change, in suchfulness and perfection of variety, withsuch harmony and supremacy of justiceand of truth, that no man known to his-toric record ever glorified the world whomit would have been so utterly natural andso comparatively rational to fall down be-fore and worship as a God.. 664 HARPERS MONTHLY MAGAZINE. I or nothing human is ever for a mo-ment above the reach or beyond thescope or beneath the notice of his all butsuperhuman genius. In this very playhe sets before mankind forever not onlythe perfect models of heroic love andhonor, of womanly sweetness and courage, of intelligent activity and joyous energyin evil, but also an unsurpassable type ofthe tragicomic dullard. Roderigo is notonly Iagos but (in Drydens masterlyphrase) God Almightys fool. AndShakespeare shows the poor devil no moremercy than Iago or than God. You seeat once that he was born to be plundered, cudgelled, and killed—if he tries to playthe villain—like a dog. No lighter comicrelief than this rather grim and pitilessexhibition of the typic fool could havebeen acceptable or admissible on thestage of so supreme a tragedy. Such humorous realism—and it is ex-cellent of its kind—as half relieves andhalf intensifies the hor

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