Handy man's workshop and laboratory . Fig. 244—Winding the wire band We now come to the last, and if not properly made, the mostdifficult and exasperating part of the detector, the moving bandor rope of iron wire. To the uninitiated this has always been asource of great difficulty and annoyance, and though simplicityitself when made in the following manner, attempts at othermethods are almost sure to result in a bungling tangled mass ofstray loops and ends. The wire of which the band is made is No. 36 silk-covered, ironwire. Select a soft pine board % inch thick about 3 feet longand 4 inches o

- Image ID: 2AKT7T9
Handy man's workshop and laboratory . Fig. 244—Winding the wire band We now come to the last, and if not properly made, the mostdifficult and exasperating part of the detector, the moving bandor rope of iron wire. To the uninitiated this has always been asource of great difficulty and annoyance, and though simplicityitself when made in the following manner, attempts at othermethods are almost sure to result in a bungling tangled mass ofstray loops and ends. The wire of which the band is made is No. 36 silk-covered, ironwire. Select a soft pine board % inch thick about 3 feet longand 4 inches o
The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: 2AKT7T9
Handy man's workshop and laboratory . Fig. 244—Winding the wire band We now come to the last, and if not properly made, the mostdifficult and exasperating part of the detector, the moving bandor rope of iron wire. To the uninitiated this has always been asource of great difficulty and annoyance, and though simplicityitself when made in the following manner, attempts at othermethods are almost sure to result in a bungling tangled mass ofstray loops and ends. The wire of which the band is made is No. 36 silk-covered, ironwire. Select a soft pine board % inch thick about 3 feet longand 4 inches or 5 inches wide. Drive two nails to a depth of ^2. Fig. 245—Removing the wire strands from the board inch in the board at a distance apart equaling twice the circum-ference of the oval formed by the two wooden disks, when meas-ured by a string passed around the grooves. Starting at one nail(Fig. 244) wind the wire from one to the other, always windingin one direction; that is, so as to inclose the two nails in a narrowcoil of wire. When the total number of strands equals 100 the HANDY MAN S WORKSHOP AND LABORATORY 305 ends are connected, and one nail is cautiously withdrawn fromthe board, keeping the wire still on it, and drawn taut (Fig. 245).Twist the strands into a rope, keeping them taut, and removethe remaining nail from the board. Both nails are now removed Fig. 246—Method of connecting the ends from the ends of the band, being careful not to disturb the loopsformed by them. Thread the band through the glass tube, pass-ing it around both pulleys and bringing the ends together betweenthem. The two ends are linked together by

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