. Handbook of nature-study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell nature-study leaflets. Nature study. Mammal Study. The inuskrat. Photo by Silas Lottridge. References—Wild Animals, Stone & Cram; A 221 It is called musk- rat because of the odor, somewhat re- sembling musk, which it exhales from two glands on the lower side of the body between the hind legs; these glands may be seen when the skin is removed, which is the too common plight of this poor creature, since it is hunted merci- lessly for its pelt. The little musk- rats are born in April and there are usually from six to ei

- Image ID: RDC357
. Handbook of nature-study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell nature-study leaflets. Nature study. Mammal Study. The inuskrat. Photo by Silas Lottridge. References—Wild Animals, Stone & Cram; A 221 It is called musk- rat because of the odor, somewhat re- sembling musk, which it exhales from two glands on the lower side of the body between the hind legs; these glands may be seen when the skin is removed, which is the too common plight of this poor creature, since it is hunted merci- lessly for its pelt. The little musk- rats are born in April and there are usually from six to ei
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDC357
. Handbook of nature-study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell nature-study leaflets. Nature study. Mammal Study. The inuskrat. Photo by Silas Lottridge. References—Wild Animals, Stone & Cram; A 221 It is called musk- rat because of the odor, somewhat re- sembling musk, which it exhales from two glands on the lower side of the body between the hind legs; these glands may be seen when the skin is removed, which is the too common plight of this poor creature, since it is hunted merci- lessly for its pelt. The little musk- rats are born in April and there are usually from six to eight in a litter. Another litter may be produced in June or July and a third in August or September. It is only thus, by rear- ing large families often, that the muskrats are able to hold their own against the hunters and trappers and their natural ene- mies. Watcher in the Woods, Sharp; Wild Life, Ingersoll; Dept. of Agriculture. Farmers' Bulletin No. 396, U. S. LESSON LIV The Muskrat Leading thought—The muskrat, while a true rodent, is fitted for life in the water more than for life upon the land. Its hind feet are webbed for use as oars and its tail is used as a rudder. It builds lodges of mud, cat-tails and rushes in which it spends the winter. Method—It might be well to begin this work by asking for observations on the tracks of the muskrat which may be found about the edges of almost any creek, pond or marsh. If there are muskrat lodges in the region they should be visited and described. For studying the muskrat's form a live muskrat in captivity is almost necessary. If one is trapped. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Comstock, Anna Botsford, 1854-1930. Ithaca, N. Y. , Comstock Publishing Company

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