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. Handbook of nature-study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell nature-study leaflets. Nature study. Insect Study 3^1 perfect wings, it does not grow larger. Many adult insects take very little food, although some continue to eat in order to support life. The adult stage is ordinarily shorter than the larval stage; it seems a part of nature's economic plan that the grown-up insects should live only long enough to lay eggs, and thus secure the continuation of the species. Insects having the four distinct stages in their growth, egg, larva, pupa and adult, are said to undergo complete

. Handbook of nature-study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell nature-study leaflets. Nature study. Insect Study 3^1 perfect wings, it does not grow larger. Many adult insects take very little food, although some continue to eat in order to support life. The adult stage is ordinarily shorter than the larval stage; it seems a part of nature's economic plan that the grown-up insects should live only long enough to lay eggs, and thus secure the continuation of the species. Insects having the four distinct stages in their growth, egg, larva, pupa and adult, are said to undergo complete  Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RDB851

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7.1 MB (202.8 KB Compressed download)

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2244 x 1113 px | 38 x 18.8 cm | 15 x 7.4 inches | 150dpi

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. Handbook of nature-study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell nature-study leaflets. Nature study. Insect Study 3^1 perfect wings, it does not grow larger. Many adult insects take very little food, although some continue to eat in order to support life. The adult stage is ordinarily shorter than the larval stage; it seems a part of nature's economic plan that the grown-up insects should live only long enough to lay eggs, and thus secure the continuation of the species. Insects having the four distinct stages in their growth, egg, larva, pupa and adult, are said to undergo complete metamorphosis. But not all insects pass through an inactive pupa stage. With some insects, like the grasshoppers, the young, as soon as they are hatched, resemble the adult forms in appearance. These insects, like the larvae, shed their skins to accommodate their growth, but they continue to feed and move about actively until the final molt when the perfect insect appears. Such insects are said to have incomplete metamorphosis, which simply means that the form of the body of the adult insect is not greatly different from that of the young; the dragon-flies, crickets, grasshoppers and bugs are of this type. The young of insects with an incomplete metamorphosis are called nymphs instead of larvae.. A young grasshopper, enlarged. The line shows its actual length. The adult of the same grasshopper, natural Summary of ihe Metamorphoses of Insects Kinds of Metamorpilosis I. Complete metamorphosis II. Incomplete metamorphosis Names of Stages Egg. Larva. Pupa. (The pupa is sometimes enclosed in a cocoon.) Adult or winged insect. ^Egg. Nymph (several stages). Adult, or imago.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Comstock, Anna Botsford, 1854-1930. Ithaca, N. Y. , Comstock Publishing Company

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