Greenhouse construction : a complete manual on the building, heating, ventilating and arrangement of greenhouses, and the construction of hotbeds, frames and plant pits . ich isnearly ninety-five per cent, of glass. The first house ofwhich we have any record, was built by Solomon deCans, at Heidelberg, Germany, about 1619. It wasused to shelter over four hundred orange trees planted intlie ground, during the winter, and consisted of woodenshutters placed over a span roof framework, so as toform the walls and roof. It was warmed by means offour large furnaces, and ventilated by opening smallshu

Greenhouse construction : a complete manual on the building, heating, ventilating and arrangement of greenhouses, and the construction of hotbeds, frames and plant pits . ich isnearly ninety-five per cent, of glass. The first house ofwhich we have any record, was built by Solomon deCans, at Heidelberg, Germany, about 1619. It wasused to shelter over four hundred orange trees planted intlie ground, during the winter, and consisted of woodenshutters placed over a span roof framework, so as toform the walls and roof. It was warmed by means offour large furnaces, and ventilated by opening smallshu Stock Photo
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Greenhouse construction : a complete manual on the building, heating, ventilating and arrangement of greenhouses, and the construction of hotbeds, frames and plant pits . ich isnearly ninety-five per cent, of glass. The first house ofwhich we have any record, was built by Solomon deCans, at Heidelberg, Germany, about 1619. It wasused to shelter over four hundred orange trees planted intlie ground, during the winter, and consisted of woodenshutters placed over a span roof framework, so as toform the walls and roof. It was warmed by means offour large furnaces, and ventilated by opening smallshutters in the sides and roof. In the spring the frame-, work was taken down. This structurCj in size^ com* 1 /J C4KEEMI0LSE CONSIKUCTION. pared well with the greenhouses of to-day, as it was twoliundred and eighty feet long and thirty-two feet wide.On account of the expense of j)ntting up and takingdown this framework, and of keeping it in repair, itwas replaced by a structui-e of freestone. This had anopaque roof, and the openings in the sides were closed?with shutters during the winter. In 1084 Ray describesa glass house (Fig. 1) used in tho Apothecaries Garden, . FIG. 1. ENGLISH GREEIfHOUSE OF 17tH CENTURY. Chelsea, England, Avhich evidently was quite similar tothe one at Heidelberg, except that it had glass windowsin the side walls ; the roof, however, was opaque. Itwas not until 1717 that glass roofs were used, and fromthat time, for one hundred years, few imj^rovementswere made. During the first part of the present century consid-erable attention was given to the slope of the roof, andin 1815 the hemispherical form was first used. Beforethe use of glass for the roof became common, the green-houses often occupied the first floor of two-story struc-tures, while the second floor was occupied by the gar-dener as a residence, or Avas used as a storeroom. The earlier greenhouses of thiS country were notunlike those used in Europe during the eighteenth ceu- HISTORY OF GREENHOUSES.