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General John Hearsey, confronting mutineers at Barrackpore, West Bengal, India, Mangal Pandey incident, 29 March 1857

General John Hearsey, confronting mutineers at Barrackpore, West Bengal, India, Mangal Pandey incident, 29 March 1857 Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Historical Images Archive / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

P7R4R0

File size:

21.9 MB (2.8 MB Compressed download)

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Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

3225 x 2369 px | 27.3 x 20.1 cm | 10.8 x 7.9 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

7 July 2018

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This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Illustration by William Barnes Wollen (1857–1936) from Cassell's Century Edition History of England, pub circa 1901. Info from wiki: On 29 March 1857 at the Barrackpore parade ground, near Calcutta, 29-year-old Mangal Pandey of the 34th BNI, angered by the recent actions of the East India Company, declared that he would rebel against his commanders. Informed about Pandey's behaviour Sergeant-Major James Hewson went to investigate, only to have Pandey shoot at him. Hewson raised the alarm.[68] When his adjutant Lt. Henry Baugh came out to investigate the unrest, Pandey opened fire but hit Baugh's horse instead.[69] General John Hearsey came out to the parade ground to investigate, and claimed later that Mangal Pandey was in some kind of "religious frenzy". He ordered the Indian commander of the quarter guard Jemadar Ishwari Prasad to arrest Mangal Pandey, but the Jemadar refused. The quarter guard and other sepoys present, with the single exception of a soldier called Shaikh Paltu, drew back from restraining or arresting Mangal Pandey. Shaikh Paltu restrained Pandey from continuing his attack.[69][70] After failing to incite his comrades into an open and active rebellion, Mangal Pandey tried to take his own life, by placing his musket to his chest and pulling the trigger with his toe. He managed only to wound himself. Court-martialled on 6 April, he was hanged two days later. The Jemadar Ishwari Prasad was sentenced to death and hanged on 22 April. The regiment was disbanded and stripped of its uniforms because it was felt that it harboured ill-feelings towards its superiors, particularly after this incident. Shaikh Paltu was promoted to the rank of havildar in the Bengal Army, but was murdered shortly before the 34th BNI dispersed.

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