Gavialis gangeticus, Print, The gharial (Gavialis gangeticus), also known as the gavial, and fish-eating crocodile is a crocodilian in the family Gavialidae, native to sandy freshwater river banks in the plains of the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. It is threatened by loss of riverine habitat, depletion of fish resources, and entanglement in fishing nets. As the wild population has declined drastically since the 1930s, the gharial is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. It once inhabited all the major river systems of the northern Indian subcontinent. Today, its

Gavialis gangeticus, Print, The gharial (Gavialis gangeticus), also known as the gavial, and fish-eating crocodile is a crocodilian in the family Gavialidae, native to sandy freshwater river banks in the plains of the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. It is threatened by loss of riverine habitat, depletion of fish resources, and entanglement in fishing nets. As the wild population has declined drastically since the 1930s, the gharial is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. It once inhabited all the major river systems of the northern Indian subcontinent. Today, its Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Artokoloro / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2A2MND3

File size:

70 MB (4.5 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

6581 x 3718 px | 55.7 x 31.5 cm | 21.9 x 12.4 inches | 300dpi

Photographer:

Artokoloro

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Gavialis gangeticus, Print, The gharial (Gavialis gangeticus), also known as the gavial, and fish-eating crocodile is a crocodilian in the family Gavialidae, native to sandy freshwater river banks in the plains of the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. It is threatened by loss of riverine habitat, depletion of fish resources, and entanglement in fishing nets. As the wild population has declined drastically since the 1930s, the gharial is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. It once inhabited all the major river systems of the northern Indian subcontinent. Today, its distribution is limited to only 2% of its historical range. It inhabits foremost flowing rivers with high sand banks that it uses for basking and building nests. Adults mate in the cold season. The young hatch before the onset of the monsoon., 1700-1880

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