RM2CYYM4PFumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, demonstrates how he uses hand-drawn 'picture shows' to share the experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs to children at his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the
RM2CYJ9E1Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, poses for a photograph as he demonstrates how he uses hand-drawn 'picture shows' to share the experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs to children at his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945,
RM2CYKY9GFumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survi