For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . hem, and the eruption continued. After seeing the lavawe drove around to the northeast side of the mountain wherethe villages were destroyed. At first the fields had a slightcoating of dust, then a few cinders, which finally became sodeep that we could drive no farther. The vineyards, that a weekbefore had been beautifully green, were now a desert. Menwere shovelling so that it would be possible to carry aid to thesufferers. Every once in a while a cart carrying a few of thehousehold goods of some family would pass, the poo
RM2AXFK9RFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . hem, and the eruption continued. After seeing the lavawe drove around to the northeast side of the mountain wherethe villages were destroyed. At first the fields had a slightcoating of dust, then a few cinders, which finally became sodeep that we could drive no farther. The vineyards, that a weekbefore had been beautifully green, were now a desert. Menwere shovelling so that it would be possible to carry aid to thesufferers. Every once in a while a cart carrying a few of thehousehold goods of some family would pass, the poo
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . liber vielerlei Gegen-stande, in my copy (Inselverlag: Leipzig). There is a new spirit in German poetry, mostly since 1870.Some great names: Sentiments: Nietzsche. Worship of power. Avoidance of pain. Jordan. The right of might. Agnosticism. Liliencron. Pleasure. Worship of beauty. Conradi. Self-interest. Lower estimate of women. Bierbaum. This new spirit in poetry is like the new spirit in art—very different fromthe old. It smacks of the frivolous side of Paris and of scientific materialism.It is less German and less inter
RM2AXFHTWFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . liber vielerlei Gegen-stande, in my copy (Inselverlag: Leipzig). There is a new spirit in German poetry, mostly since 1870.Some great names: Sentiments: Nietzsche. Worship of power. Avoidance of pain. Jordan. The right of might. Agnosticism. Liliencron. Pleasure. Worship of beauty. Conradi. Self-interest. Lower estimate of women. Bierbaum. This new spirit in poetry is like the new spirit in art—very different fromthe old. It smacks of the frivolous side of Paris and of scientific materialism.It is less German and less inter
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . ress was simple but harmonious, browns relieved by touches of soft pinkwere specially becoming to her. We all recall her sweet expression, andthe serenity with which she moved. Her mind, too, as has been said, wasof the Greek type—she loved music, art and languages; her favorite writerswere the old Greek poets and philosophers. I have a post card sent from Rome last spring, my last direct communica-tion from her, in which she says, A week is too short in which to see thisImperial City. She enjoyed most thoroughly and intell
RM2AXFJXTFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . ress was simple but harmonious, browns relieved by touches of soft pinkwere specially becoming to her. We all recall her sweet expression, andthe serenity with which she moved. Her mind, too, as has been said, wasof the Greek type—she loved music, art and languages; her favorite writerswere the old Greek poets and philosophers. I have a post card sent from Rome last spring, my last direct communica-tion from her, in which she says, A week is too short in which to see thisImperial City. She enjoyed most thoroughly and intell
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . you traverse the pallid distances,And your rumors are like vague clarions,And I have more of suns than you have gnats.My immensity lives radiant and fecund.Sometimes I know not if the remnant of the world,Wandering in some corner of the desolate firmament,May not have vanished in my radiance. THE NEBULA. To whom then speakest thou, far passing cloud?We scarcely hear thy voice in the gulfs of space.We distinguish thee only as a nimbus obscureIn the most lost corner of the most nocturnal azure.Let us shine on in peace, we whi
RM2AXFGWBFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . you traverse the pallid distances,And your rumors are like vague clarions,And I have more of suns than you have gnats.My immensity lives radiant and fecund.Sometimes I know not if the remnant of the world,Wandering in some corner of the desolate firmament,May not have vanished in my radiance. THE NEBULA. To whom then speakest thou, far passing cloud?We scarcely hear thy voice in the gulfs of space.We distinguish thee only as a nimbus obscureIn the most lost corner of the most nocturnal azure.Let us shine on in peace, we whi
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . 50. FLAG OF OUR LAND. By Erwin F. Smith. From The Evening Star, Wash ington, D. C, June 7, 1M7. Flag of our land, flag that it stirs us to see!Crimson her bars in the suns white light,And silver her stars on the blue of night;Glory, Old Glory, symbol of freedom and might,Our past, today, and the mighty realm to be.Whither thou leadest we go, flag of the free! Banner beloved, flag of our land! Sunlight and starlight twain are her friends, The God of all righteousness energy lends To the ranks of the free when they make their
RM2AXFKP9For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . 50. FLAG OF OUR LAND. By Erwin F. Smith. From The Evening Star, Wash ington, D. C, June 7, 1M7. Flag of our land, flag that it stirs us to see!Crimson her bars in the suns white light,And silver her stars on the blue of night;Glory, Old Glory, symbol of freedom and might,Our past, today, and the mighty realm to be.Whither thou leadest we go, flag of the free! Banner beloved, flag of our land! Sunlight and starlight twain are her friends, The God of all righteousness energy lends To the ranks of the free when they make their
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . FLAG OF OUR LAND. By Erwin F. Smith. From The Evening Star, Wash ington, D. C, June 7, 1M7. Flag of our land, flag that it stirs us to see!Crimson her bars in the suns white light,And silver her stars on the blue of night;Glory, Old Glory, symbol of freedom and might,Our past, today, and the mighty realm to be.Whither thou leadest we go, flag of the free! Banner beloved, flag of our land! Sunlight and starlight twain are her friends, The God of all righteousness energy lends To the ranks of the free when they make their sta
RM2AXFKK7For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . FLAG OF OUR LAND. By Erwin F. Smith. From The Evening Star, Wash ington, D. C, June 7, 1M7. Flag of our land, flag that it stirs us to see!Crimson her bars in the suns white light,And silver her stars on the blue of night;Glory, Old Glory, symbol of freedom and might,Our past, today, and the mighty realm to be.Whither thou leadest we go, flag of the free! Banner beloved, flag of our land! Sunlight and starlight twain are her friends, The God of all righteousness energy lends To the ranks of the free when they make their sta
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . his little, kindle greater blame! My God! do I not know how hard it isNever to be from justice passion-hurled! To bide in will and deed unsoiled of hell!To walk with blameless feet a thorny world!Then why should I think aught of him but wellWho, falling, strives? My path, is it not his? At 1474 Belmont Street, July 4, 1915. 282 CXCVII. VASTNESS. Lord, what are we that struggle, dream and pray!For every star whose image ocean keepsA hundred million glow in those vast deeps The telescope reveals, light-years away! From some v
RM2AXFJ9CFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . his little, kindle greater blame! My God! do I not know how hard it isNever to be from justice passion-hurled! To bide in will and deed unsoiled of hell!To walk with blameless feet a thorny world!Then why should I think aught of him but wellWho, falling, strives? My path, is it not his? At 1474 Belmont Street, July 4, 1915. 282 CXCVII. VASTNESS. Lord, what are we that struggle, dream and pray!For every star whose image ocean keepsA hundred million glow in those vast deeps The telescope reveals, light-years away! From some v
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . FROM THE FRENCH AND ITALIAN.. XXXIII. THE ANTIQUE MEDAL. (I/Etna murit toujours la pourpre et lor du vin)Jose-Maria de Heredia. Still Aetna ripens wine of gold and purple stainWherewith antique Erigone warmed Theocrite,But the graceful maids from whom his verses caught delight, The poet now would seek for them in vain. From her profile losing the purity divine,Arethusa, slave and favorite by turns,Has mingled in her vein, where Greek blood burns, The Saracen fury with the hauteur Angevine. All yields to time: even the marbl
RM2AXFHEJFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . FROM THE FRENCH AND ITALIAN.. XXXIII. THE ANTIQUE MEDAL. (I/Etna murit toujours la pourpre et lor du vin)Jose-Maria de Heredia. Still Aetna ripens wine of gold and purple stainWherewith antique Erigone warmed Theocrite,But the graceful maids from whom his verses caught delight, The poet now would seek for them in vain. From her profile losing the purity divine,Arethusa, slave and favorite by turns,Has mingled in her vein, where Greek blood burns, The Saracen fury with the hauteur Angevine. All yields to time: even the marbl
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . th such longing melody Of glamouring woodland, mere, and lea— Avons one touch, thatmakes the whole world kin! J. H. H., January 20, 1914. 84 A LOVE SONG. Io Hymen, Hymenaee.—Catullus. On the red mans prairie, miles from anywhere,The silvery, silky globes of the pasque* unfold In the warm spring air. By men unseen the miracle goes on Till their bridal robes—laced-silver, and purple, and gold— The anemones don. Only the wandering bees and the butterflies know,The meadows, dearer to them than the wings they have on, Where the
RM2AXFJJGFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . th such longing melody Of glamouring woodland, mere, and lea— Avons one touch, thatmakes the whole world kin! J. H. H., January 20, 1914. 84 A LOVE SONG. Io Hymen, Hymenaee.—Catullus. On the red mans prairie, miles from anywhere,The silvery, silky globes of the pasque* unfold In the warm spring air. By men unseen the miracle goes on Till their bridal robes—laced-silver, and purple, and gold— The anemones don. Only the wandering bees and the butterflies know,The meadows, dearer to them than the wings they have on, Where the
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . e who fears a great hole, I am afraid of sleep, Full of vague horror, leading one knows not whither—this deep; Out of all my windows only infinity I see, And my spirit by vertigo ever annoyed Longs for the insensibility of the void. —Ah! Prom Numbers and from Beings never to be free! (Les Fleurs du mal.) 364 EVILTO DANTE ALIGHIERI. (Dal mondo scese ai ciechi abissi, e poi,) Michael Angelo. He descended from Earth to the blind abysses, and then,The two Infernos seen, guided by his great thought,Ascended living unto God, and
RM2AXFH67For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . e who fears a great hole, I am afraid of sleep, Full of vague horror, leading one knows not whither—this deep; Out of all my windows only infinity I see, And my spirit by vertigo ever annoyed Longs for the insensibility of the void. —Ah! Prom Numbers and from Beings never to be free! (Les Fleurs du mal.) 364 EVILTO DANTE ALIGHIERI. (Dal mondo scese ai ciechi abissi, e poi,) Michael Angelo. He descended from Earth to the blind abysses, and then,The two Infernos seen, guided by his great thought,Ascended living unto God, and
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . pense, avrai dire, elle ny pensa jamais. * * * La vertu netait pas chez ellele fruit dune theorie, mais le resultat dun pli absolu de natur. Elle fitle bien, pour le bien et non pour son salut. * * * Que son souvenirnous reste comme un precieux argument de ces verites eternelles que chaquevie vertueuse contribue a demontrer. 45 Following these fragmentary notes I have placed parts ofthree of her letters (describing Baracoa and Naples), and anappreciation by two of her neighbors who describe better thanI could hope to do it
RM2AXFNJXFor her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . pense, avrai dire, elle ny pensa jamais. * * * La vertu netait pas chez ellele fruit dune theorie, mais le resultat dun pli absolu de natur. Elle fitle bien, pour le bien et non pour son salut. * * * Que son souvenirnous reste comme un precieux argument de ces verites eternelles que chaquevie vertueuse contribue a demontrer. 45 Following these fragmentary notes I have placed parts ofthree of her letters (describing Baracoa and Naples), and anappreciation by two of her neighbors who describe better thanI could hope to do it
For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . 373 LENVOI. (Woods Hole, Mass.) These songs are done! Farewell, my dear, farewell!Out of thine ashes grow all lovely thingsThat bud and bloom, or rise on joyous wings, Or in the beryl sea-deep twilight dwell! Thy spirit unto mine a quickening flameOf high resolve, an impulse unto good,A hand that never tires—all this I would, Till hungering souls through me shall bless thy name. So shalt thou live in other lives on earth,And from thy dwelling place within Gods heartFind all is good! There may each have his part, And find in
RM2AXFGJ9For her friends and mine: a book of aspirations, dreams and memories . 373 LENVOI. (Woods Hole, Mass.) These songs are done! Farewell, my dear, farewell!Out of thine ashes grow all lovely thingsThat bud and bloom, or rise on joyous wings, Or in the beryl sea-deep twilight dwell! Thy spirit unto mine a quickening flameOf high resolve, an impulse unto good,A hand that never tires—all this I would, Till hungering souls through me shall bless thy name. So shalt thou live in other lives on earth,And from thy dwelling place within Gods heartFind all is good! There may each have his part, And find in