. Flowers of the field. Botany. COMPOUND FLOWERS 167 2. A. vulgaris (Mug-wort).—Leaves pinriatifid, with acute seg- ments ; white with down beneath ; heath oblong, reddish. Taller and more slender than the last ; well distijiguished by the leaves being green above and white below, and by "the absence of aromatic odour. Hedges and waste places ; common. A tea made from this plant is used in country districts as a remedy for rheumatism. —Fl. July to September. Perennial, 3. A. maritima (Sea Wormwood).—Leaves twice pinnatifid, downy on both sides; heads in racemes, oblong. Somewhat resemblin

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. Flowers of the field. Botany. COMPOUND FLOWERS 167 2. A. vulgaris (Mug-wort).—Leaves pinriatifid, with acute seg- ments ; white with down beneath ; heath oblong, reddish. Taller and more slender than the last ; well distijiguished by the leaves being green above and white below, and by "the absence of aromatic odour. Hedges and waste places ; common. A tea made from this plant is used in country districts as a remedy for rheumatism. —Fl. July to September. Perennial, 3. A. maritima (Sea Wormwood).—Leaves twice pinnatifid, downy on both sides; heads in racemes, oblong. Somewhat resemblin
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Image ID: RE1NXK
. Flowers of the field. Botany. COMPOUND FLOWERS 167 2. A. vulgaris (Mug-wort).—Leaves pinriatifid, with acute seg- ments ; white with down beneath ; heath oblong, reddish. Taller and more slender than the last ; well distijiguished by the leaves being green above and white below, and by "the absence of aromatic odour. Hedges and waste places ; common. A tea made from this plant is used in country districts as a remedy for rheumatism. —Fl. July to September. Perennial, 3. A. maritima (Sea Wormwood).—Leaves twice pinnatifid, downy on both sides; heads in racemes, oblong. Somewhat resembling A. ahsmthinm, but smaller, and well distinguished by the above characters. The clusters ot reddish flower-heads are sometimes drooping, sometimes erect. Salt marshes ; frequent.— Fl. July to September. Perennial. 4. A. campestris (Field Wormwood).—A rare species, growing on sandy heaths in Norfolk and Suffolk. In this species the seg- ments of the leaves are narrow, terminating in points; and the stems, until flowering, are prostrate. aS. Antennaria (Everlasting) 1. A. dioica (Mountain Cudweed). -The only British species. A pretty little plant, 3-6 inches high, with oblong leaves, which are broadest towards the end, green above, cottony below ; the heads of flowers grow 4-6 together, and are rendered conspicuous by the white or rose-coloured involucre, which is of the texture commonly termed everlast- ing. Mountain heaths ; frequent.—Fl. July, August. Perennial. 2. A. margaritacea (the White Everlasting of gardens) is 2-5 feet high, with cottony narrow leaves, and flat corymbs of small yellowish flower-heads with white involucres. It is not indigenous, but is found naturalized in South Wales, the Channel Isles, and Scotland. Perennial.. Antennaria Dioica (Mountain Cudweed) -Fl. July, .\ugust. 29. Gnaphalium [Cudweed) I. G. uliginosum (Marsh Cudweed). — Stems much branched, woolly ; leaves very narrow, downy, over-topping the clustered terminal heads. A small pla