. Florists' review [microform]. Floriculture. Shftbmbkb 23, 1920 The Florists' Review 31. Wmiam J. Halliday. In the death of William J. Halliday, of Baltimore, Md., Wednesday evening, September 15, occurred the passing of the last member of a generation of a family which has had much effect on the florists' business in Baltimore. Mr. Halliday was one of five children of Robert J. Halliday, who was one of the pioneers in the florists' business in Baltimore. Mr. Halliday emigrated from Scotland to Baltimore and started in the nursery and florists' business at Pennsylvania avenue and Dolphin stre

- Image ID: RRHC3E
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RRHC3E
. Florists' review [microform]. Floriculture. Shftbmbkb 23, 1920 The Florists' Review 31. Wmiam J. Halliday. In the death of William J. Halliday, of Baltimore, Md., Wednesday evening, September 15, occurred the passing of the last member of a generation of a family which has had much effect on the florists' business in Baltimore. Mr. Halliday was one of five children of Robert J. Halliday, who was one of the pioneers in the florists' business in Baltimore. Mr. Halliday emigrated from Scotland to Baltimore and started in the nursery and florists' business at Pennsylvania avenue and Dolphin street in 1837. Associated with him were his three sons, William J., Bobert J. and James; the two girls, Mary J. and Fannie, looked after the store. In later years Bobert J. and his sister, who afterward married Daniel Thomas, branched out on their own account. About twenty-five years ago William J. Halliday married Miss Katie L. Bracket, who had spent the greater part of her life in the Halliday employ. After his marriage he, too, embarked in business on his own account and up to the time of his death conducted one of the most exclusive flower stores in the city. His range on Liberty Heights avenue was devoted entirely to orchids, of which he made a specialty. He was a man of quiet and retiring disposition, but any florist in trouble was sure to find in him a friend. His funeral, which was largely attended by the flo- rists of this and near-by cities, was from his residence, on Liberty Heights avenue, Saturday, September 18, at 3 p. m. The floral offerings were numer- ous and handsome. The trade mourns the loss of one of its best advisers, as well as a friend who was respected by all who knew him. Tate. WUllam F. Keys. William F. Keys, of 951 North Gay street, Baltimore, Md., died after an illness of one and a half years at Mercy hospital, September 18, where he had been a patient for six weeks. He is survived by his widow and three chil- dren: Mrs. Southern J. Scott, of Florida;