. Florists' review [microform]. Floriculture. 64 The Florists^ Review Jdli 11, 1912. OOBN BBEEDmO. [Oontlnued from page 62.] large measure prevents inbreeding; for instance, the largest leaf on the plant is the one directly over the ear; and again, the male flower appears first, and a large portion of its pollen has fallen by the time the silk appears. It has also been ascertained that when inbreeding is completely pre- vented, the vigor of the seed is in- creased, the increased vigor manifest- ing itself in an increased yield of from five to ten bushels per acre in the next generation. The ex

. Florists' review [microform]. Floriculture. 64 The Florists^ Review Jdli 11, 1912. OOBN BBEEDmO. [Oontlnued from page 62.] large measure prevents inbreeding; for instance, the largest leaf on the plant is the one directly over the ear; and again, the male flower appears first, and a large portion of its pollen has fallen by the time the silk appears. It has also been ascertained that when inbreeding is completely pre- vented, the vigor of the seed is in- creased, the increased vigor manifest- ing itself in an increased yield of from five to ten bushels per acre in the next generation. The ex Stock Photo
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. Florists' review [microform]. Floriculture. 64 The Florists^ Review Jdli 11, 1912. OOBN BBEEDmO. [Oontlnued from page 62.] large measure prevents inbreeding; for instance, the largest leaf on the plant is the one directly over the ear; and again, the male flower appears first, and a large portion of its pollen has fallen by the time the silk appears. It has also been ascertained that when inbreeding is completely pre- vented, the vigor of the seed is in- creased, the increased vigor manifest- ing itself in an increased yield of from five to ten bushels per acre in the next generation. The extra yield from this source is one of the benefits derived from the method of breeding known as the ear-to-row system. By simple selection, as usually prac- ticed, we cannot hope to do much more than improve the type. Possibly by selecting ears with respect to their high scoring points we can produce corn the individual ears of which would indicate high yielding stock, but which actually might not produce more corn per acre than that grown from less ideal ears. But when we consider each ear as an individual, and as the mother parent of the next generation, we can resort to some method whereby we may keep track of its performance as a producer. As I said before, the cob is the real mother and governs the size and shape of the ear. But when the kernels are planted, we musU expect the influence of the numerous and unknown father- hood to show itself, and there is of course but an even chance that the progeny will resemble the fine ear se- lected, for like rarely produces exact likeness in a corn field, and only in cases where the mother blood has greater potency than that of the male parent. A farmer once said to me, "Why is it that when I select the finest ears in my crop for seed, the next crop does not contain more ears like the ones plantedf" My reply was this: "If you should purchase a fine mare that was practically your ideal of such an animal, and later find t

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