Florence Nightingale as seen in her portraits : with a sketch of her life, and an account of her relation to the origin of the Red Cross Society . that came toher in later years, a sense of proportionatevalues, and a capacity of taking herself andothers for granted, that was one of the ele-ments in her power, and that could probablyhave come to her in no other way. The richEnglish scenery, too, in which she lived through-out her childhood and girlhood days, and inwhich she revelled consciously, even as a littlechild, must have sunk deep into her observantand sensitive nature, and been to the g

Florence Nightingale as seen in her portraits : with a sketch of her life, and an account of her relation to the origin of the Red Cross Society . that came toher in later years, a sense of proportionatevalues, and a capacity of taking herself andothers for granted, that was one of the ele-ments in her power, and that could probablyhave come to her in no other way. The richEnglish scenery, too, in which she lived through-out her childhood and girlhood days, and inwhich she revelled consciously, even as a littlechild, must have sunk deep into her observantand sensitive nature, and been to the g Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AXJY1G

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7.2 MB (549.9 KB Compressed download)

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1308 x 1911 px | 22.1 x 32.4 cm | 8.7 x 12.7 inches | 150dpi

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Florence Nightingale as seen in her portraits : with a sketch of her life, and an account of her relation to the origin of the Red Cross Society . that came toher in later years, a sense of proportionatevalues, and a capacity of taking herself andothers for granted, that was one of the ele-ments in her power, and that could probablyhave come to her in no other way. The richEnglish scenery, too, in which she lived through-out her childhood and girlhood days, and inwhich she revelled consciously, even as a littlechild, must have sunk deep into her observantand sensitive nature, and been to the great spir-itual powers lying dormant there, as springs ofwater in a thirsty land. For there are fewmore beautiful homes and surroundings in Eng-land than the estates of Lea Hurst in Derby-shire, and Embley in Surrey, on which, with hisfamily, Mr. Nightingale passed alternately thewinter and summer months of every year. The two sisters were the objects of much ten-der personal care from their parents. Mrs.Nightingale was a woman who accepted and ad-hered strictly to the religious and social con-ventions of her day, but, within their limits, 9. ILAiE 1. Mrs. ^KjHTInuale and Her Daughters, 1828. From a portrait in the possession of Mrs. CuiiHffe, and reproduced in Sir Edward CooksLife of Florence Nightingale. 10 she was prompt and generous in the exercise ofa philanthropy that devolved as a duty uponan Englishwoman of her means and position.Both her daughters were early permitted toshare in their mothers solicitude for the poor oftheir fathers estate, and to accompany her onerrands of help among them. Such activitiesappealed especially to Florence, who quickly re-vealed her innate sympathy for the sick, phil-anthropic bent, and deeply religious nature. Thecontrast between the lot of rich and poor struckher then, as it continued to do with increasingforce throughout life, as an incongruity, andher childish diaries and letters contain naivecomparisons and comments. She was a healthyc

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