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. First[-ninth] annual report on the noxious, beneficial and other insects, of the state of Missouri, made to the State board of agriculture, pursuant to an appropriation for this purpose from the Legislature of the state . ts superiorly. Sparselj garnished with stiff,rufous hairs. THE CLOVER-HAY y^OUK—Asopia eostalis (Fabr).(Ord. LKriDOiTEKA; Fam. Pykalidjk). This is a very widely distributed little insect, for it occurs in many?parts of Europe and Canada, and is quite generally found throughoutthe Eastern and Middle States, and in the Mississippi Valley—having, no doubt, been originally impo

. First[-ninth] annual report on the noxious, beneficial and other insects, of the state of Missouri, made to the State board of agriculture, pursuant to an appropriation for this purpose from the Legislature of the state . ts superiorly. Sparselj garnished with stiff,rufous hairs. THE CLOVER-HAY y^OUK—Asopia eostalis (Fabr).(Ord. LKriDOiTEKA; Fam. Pykalidjk). This is a very widely distributed little insect, for it occurs in many?parts of Europe and Canada, and is quite generally found throughoutthe Eastern and Middle States, and in the Mississippi Valley—having, no doubt, been originally impo Stock Photo
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. First[-ninth] annual report on the noxious, beneficial and other insects, of the state of Missouri, made to the State board of agriculture, pursuant to an appropriation for this purpose from the Legislature of the state . ts superiorly. Sparselj garnished with stiff,rufous hairs. THE CLOVER-HAY y^OUK—Asopia eostalis (Fabr).(Ord. LKriDOiTEKA; Fam. Pykalidjk). This is a very widely distributed little insect, for it occurs in many?parts of Europe and Canada, and is quite generally found throughoutthe Eastern and Middle States, and in the Mississippi Valley—having, no doubt, been originally importedinto this country from Europe, likeso many other troublesome specieswhich infest dried grains, fruits andother preserved food. Such insectsare easily and almost unavoidablytransported from country to country,and as there were, so far as we haveany knowledge, no clover stacksmade in this country before Colum-bus time, we have an a priori ve?L-i^^hkrc^^Lh son for not considering the present , coverea with silken . ,. -r. ^ • L^ Avcb. species indigenous. It must either have been imported or—if native—have acquired an entirely newhabit during recent times. So far as we have any positive knowledge,. ASOlIA COSTALIS:—1, 2, chrysalis; 5, (i, jiioth with wings exi and closed; 7, worm, covered with silken OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST. 103 it feeds on no other plant,* and certainly not on clover in its greenand growing condition, lor I have, in vain, endeavored to feed it withsuch. Nor is a worm that is so fastidious as to touch none other butclover hay, likely to prove a general feeder. ITS PAST HISTORY. For many years grievous complaints were made in this countryof a worm which infested clover, both in the stack and mow, andspoiled it for feeding purposes by interweaving and covering it withabundant white silken web and black excrement, much resemblingcoarse gun-powder. Frequently the silken matting is so dense thatthe hay looks moldy, and it is not improbable that mu