Ferguson, Missouri Mayor James Knowles announces that Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down, in Ferguson, Missouri on March 11, 2015. Jacksons departure is being called a mutual separation and will be effective March 19. Jackson is leaving following a Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias.    Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
RMW07J8XFerguson, Missouri Mayor James Knowles announces that Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down, in Ferguson, Missouri on March 11, 2015. Jacksons departure is being called a mutual separation and will be effective March 19. Jackson is leaving following a Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
Ferguson, Missouri Mayor JAMES KNOWLES speaks to the crowd of Ferguson residents and invited guests during the ceremony to swear in the new police chief. 9th May, 2016. © Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
RMG161Y2Ferguson, Missouri Mayor JAMES KNOWLES speaks to the crowd of Ferguson residents and invited guests during the ceremony to swear in the new police chief. 9th May, 2016. © Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III briefly speaks with the community after a television appearance in Ferguson, Missouri on August 19, 2014. The violence has captured international headlines, raising questions about the state of U.S. race relations nearly six years after Americans elected their first black president. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS)
RM2CY3RHMFerguson Mayor James Knowles III briefly speaks with the community after a television appearance in Ferguson, Missouri on August 19, 2014. The violence has captured international headlines, raising questions about the state of U.S. race relations nearly six years after Americans elected their first black president. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS)
Ferguson, Missouri Mayor JAMES KNOWLES speaks to the crowd of Ferguson residents and invited guests during the ceremony to swear in the new police chief. 9th May, 2016. © Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
RMG161Y3Ferguson, Missouri Mayor JAMES KNOWLES speaks to the crowd of Ferguson residents and invited guests during the ceremony to swear in the new police chief. 9th May, 2016. © Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III engaged in a brief dialogue with opposition leaders in Ferguson, Missouri on August 19, 2014. Some, like Malik Shabazz (R), national president of Black Lawyers for Justice, said that while he may not agree with the policy decisions of Mayor Knowles, he stated that a dialogue was necessary to move forward. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS)
RM2E6AX21Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III engaged in a brief dialogue with opposition leaders in Ferguson, Missouri on August 19, 2014. Some, like Malik Shabazz (R), national president of Black Lawyers for Justice, said that while he may not agree with the policy decisions of Mayor Knowles, he stated that a dialogue was necessary to move forward. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS)
Ferguson, Missouri, USA. 5th Apr, 2017. Ferguson Mayor JAMES KNOWLES is embraced by his father after the announcement he was re-election. Credit: Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
RMHYJA3NFerguson, Missouri, USA. 5th Apr, 2017. Ferguson Mayor JAMES KNOWLES is embraced by his father after the announcement he was re-election. Credit: Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III speaks with opposition leaders including Malik Shabazz (R) after a television appearance in Ferguson, Missouri on August 19, 2014. Shabazz, national president of Black Lawyers for Justice, said that while he may not agree with the policy decisions of Mayor Knowles, he stated that a dialogue was necessary to move forward. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS)
RM2D05KTRFerguson Mayor James Knowles III speaks with opposition leaders including Malik Shabazz (R) after a television appearance in Ferguson, Missouri on August 19, 2014. Shabazz, national president of Black Lawyers for Justice, said that while he may not agree with the policy decisions of Mayor Knowles, he stated that a dialogue was necessary to move forward. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS)
Mayor of Ferguson James Knowles (2nd L) leaves a news conference in Ferguson, Missouri, March 14, 2015. As the hunt for suspects in the shooting of two police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, extended into a third day on Saturday, an anxious calm settled over the St. Louis suburb and residents awaited tangible signs of progress in the investigation.  REUTERS/Jim Young  (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
RM2D097CNMayor of Ferguson James Knowles (2nd L) leaves a news conference in Ferguson, Missouri, March 14, 2015. As the hunt for suspects in the shooting of two police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, extended into a third day on Saturday, an anxious calm settled over the St. Louis suburb and residents awaited tangible signs of progress in the investigation. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
Ferguson, Missouri Mayor James Knowles addresses a press conference with the announcement that Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down, in Ferguson, Missouri on March 11, 2015. Jacksons departure is being called a mutual separation and will be effective March 19. Jackson is leaving following a Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias.    Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
RMW07J8JFerguson, Missouri Mayor James Knowles addresses a press conference with the announcement that Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down, in Ferguson, Missouri on March 11, 2015. Jacksons departure is being called a mutual separation and will be effective March 19. Jackson is leaving following a Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
Ferguson, Missouri, USA. 5th Apr, 2017. Ferguson Mayor JAMES KNOWLES holds his son while he votes in Ferguson, MO Credit: Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
RMHYJA38Ferguson, Missouri, USA. 5th Apr, 2017. Ferguson Mayor JAMES KNOWLES holds his son while he votes in Ferguson, MO Credit: Steve Pellegrino/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News
Mayor of Ferguson James Knowles looks on during a news conference in Ferguson, Missouri, March 14, 2015. As the hunt for suspects in the shooting of two police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, extended into a third day on Saturday, an anxious calm settled over the St. Louis suburb and residents awaited tangible signs of progress in the investigation. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
RM2CYHPK6Mayor of Ferguson James Knowles looks on during a news conference in Ferguson, Missouri, March 14, 2015. As the hunt for suspects in the shooting of two police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, extended into a third day on Saturday, an anxious calm settled over the St. Louis suburb and residents awaited tangible signs of progress in the investigation. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
Ferguson, Missouri Mayor James Knowles leaves a press conference following the announcement that Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down, in Ferguson, Missouri on March 11, 2015. Jacksons departure is being called a mutual separation and will be effective March 19. Jackson is leaving following a Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias.    Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
RMW07J8KFerguson, Missouri Mayor James Knowles leaves a press conference following the announcement that Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down, in Ferguson, Missouri on March 11, 2015. Jacksons departure is being called a mutual separation and will be effective March 19. Jackson is leaving following a Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI