Feb. 25, 2012 - TOKYO'S KING-SIZE COLOUR TV SET: A huge colour TV set with a 100-inch (2.5 meter) screen is showing programmes to the public from the third floor of the Sony building at Sukiyabashi, Tokyo. The set which took the company two years to build is believed to be the biggest in the world. A total of 78.000 electric bulbs of red, blue, and green colours are used in the set instead of the usual tube. An electronic computer feeds the bulbs with electric impulses received by an antenna. The trial manufacture cost about £10,000 (7,777). The TV set shows from 6-30 to 9-30 pm daily

- Image ID: E12WWJ
Feb. 25, 2012 - TOKYO'S KING-SIZE COLOUR TV SET: A huge colour TV set with a 100-inch (2.5 meter) screen is showing programmes to the public from the third floor of the Sony building at Sukiyabashi, Tokyo. The set which took the company two years to build is believed to be the biggest in the world. A total of 78.000 electric bulbs of red, blue, and green colours are used in the set instead of the usual tube. An electronic computer feeds the bulbs with electric impulses received by an antenna. The trial manufacture cost about £10,000 (7,777). The TV set shows from 6-30 to 9-30 pm daily
Keystone Press / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: E12WWJ
Feb. 25, 2012 - TOKYO'S KING-SIZE COLOUR TV SET: A huge colour TV set with a 100-inch (2.5 meter) screen is showing programmes to the public from the third floor of the Sony building at Sukiyabashi, Tokyo. The set which took the company two years to build is believed to be the biggest in the world. A total of 78.000 electric bulbs of red, blue, and green colours are used in the set instead of the usual tube. An electronic computer feeds the bulbs with electric impulses received by an antenna. The trial manufacture cost about £10,000 (7,777). The TV set shows from 6-30 to 9-30 pm daily. Photo shows: Crowds looking at a TV programme being broadcast-ironically one of the first shows was of Senator Robert F. Kennedy campaigning in Los Angeles where he was shot, and he can be seen on the huge screen speaking. (Credit Image: Keystone Pictures USA/ZUMAPRESS)