Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . ntile which has one end plugged with a cement cap orcovering. The shoots coming up inside of the tile are well blanched,and this method has the advantage of making it possible to examinethe shoots at any time to see how they are coming along. It hasat least one disadvantage, however, in that the shoots have a tendencyto leaf out and produce a number of unopened leafstalks which take EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 11 away from the robust growth of the shoots. A method which hasobviated this defect in using tiles is to put around each hill a deepbox or s

Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . ntile which has one end plugged with a cement cap orcovering. The shoots coming up inside of the tile are well blanched,and this method has the advantage of making it possible to examinethe shoots at any time to see how they are coming along. It hasat least one disadvantage, however, in that the shoots have a tendencyto leaf out and produce a number of unopened leafstalks which take EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 11 away from the robust growth of the shoots. A method which hasobviated this defect in using tiles is to put around each hill a deepbox or s Stock Photo
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1754 x 1425 px | 29.7 x 24.1 cm | 11.7 x 9.5 inches | 150dpi

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Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . ntile which has one end plugged with a cement cap orcovering. The shoots coming up inside of the tile are well blanched, and this method has the advantage of making it possible to examinethe shoots at any time to see how they are coming along. It hasat least one disadvantage, however, in that the shoots have a tendencyto leaf out and produce a number of unopened leafstalks which take EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 11 away from the robust growth of the shoots. A method which hasobviated this defect in using tiles is to put around each hill a deepbox or small half cask from which the bottom has been removed andfill it with light sand or such a light material as sifted coal ashes.Shoots which come up through such a medium are almost free fromthe elongated leafstalks which are developed when the shoots areproduced in the dark air chambers under the tiles.1 Care must betaken in any method of mounding up or filling in dirt or ashes overthe crowns that the shoots do not break through into the sunlight. Fig. 10.—The blanched shoots from a single crown of udo from which the draintilehas just been removed. Note the slender leafstalks rising from the main stems.This forms an objection to the use of the draintile or any method of forcing in aclosed air chamber. for as soon as they do this they become green and take on a rank, objectionable flavor. Properly grown udo shoots produced from 3-year-old plants shouldbe from 12 to 18 inches long and 1 inch to 1J inches in diameter attheir bases (fig. 10). Such shoots r.re tender throughout, with notrace of fiber except in the rather thick bark, which can be easilyremoved. Naturally, if one is impatient for the very first udo shoots, 1 Thinking to overcome this difficulty, the experiment was made of filling the tileswith soil before inverting them over the crowns, but the plants refused to grow upthrough this soil. 12 BULLETIN 84. U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. he can cut them when only 6 inc

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