Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914)
RMHE0PYDExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914)
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914) (14779270525)
RMM89AN0Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914) (14779270525)
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . BULLETIN OF THE £ No. 84experimentswithu84fair
RM2AWGDJJExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . BULLETIN OF THE £ No. 84experimentswithu84fair
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914)
RMGHWXC7Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914)
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914) (14776917214)
RMM89AMYExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable (1914) (14776917214)
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . Fig. 2.—Field of udo at Chevy Chase, Md., showing draintiles used to blanch the shoots in the spring.. Fig. 3.—The first field of commercial udo in the United States, on the asparagus farmof Mr. M. E. Meek, Antioch, Cal.
RM2AWGCKYExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . Fig. 2.—Field of udo at Chevy Chase, Md., showing draintiles used to blanch the shoots in the spring.. Fig. 3.—The first field of commercial udo in the United States, on the asparagus farmof Mr. M. E. Meek, Antioch, Cal.
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . into the middle of May in the latitudeof Washington, D. C, which will be a great advantage, and it isprobable that other characteristics will be discovered as experimentersbecome familiar with these strains. BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. METHOD OF CULTURE. Much remains to be done in the working out of the most inexpen-sive methods of cultivating udo. Conditions of labor and materialsare so different here from those in Japan that the methods of theJapanese have to be adapted to our own circumstances. The climatein America, at le
RM2AWGB2TExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . into the middle of May in the latitudeof Washington, D. C, which will be a great advantage, and it isprobable that other characteristics will be discovered as experimentersbecome familiar with these strains. BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. METHOD OF CULTURE. Much remains to be done in the working out of the most inexpen-sive methods of cultivating udo. Conditions of labor and materialsare so different here from those in Japan that the methods of theJapanese have to be adapted to our own circumstances. The climatein America, at le
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . Contribution from the Bureau of Plant Industry, Wm. A. Taylor, ChiefApril 16, 1914. EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO, THE NEW JAPANESEVEGETABLE, By David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge of the Office of ForeignSeed and Plant Introduction. INTRODUCTION. A decade has passed since the udo of Japan was first proposedas a vegetable to be grown by Americans. This is a short time forthe introduction of a new vegetable, when one considers that itmeans simply that at ten different times experimenters have had achance to taste its blanched shoots. But it
RM2AWGD5HExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . Contribution from the Bureau of Plant Industry, Wm. A. Taylor, ChiefApril 16, 1914. EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO, THE NEW JAPANESEVEGETABLE, By David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge of the Office of ForeignSeed and Plant Introduction. INTRODUCTION. A decade has passed since the udo of Japan was first proposedas a vegetable to be grown by Americans. This is a short time forthe introduction of a new vegetable, when one considers that itmeans simply that at ten different times experimenters have had achance to taste its blanched shoots. But it
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . nd many of thetips were green from exposure to sunlight above the mounds. Though slightly dis-colored, these were of good quality when prepared for the table. 4 BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. There is no doubt that the uclo is worthy of adding to our list ofspring vegetables, for it is easily grown, its shoots are readilyblanched, and it requires little care. A patch of it can be forcedevery spring for at least six years, and probably much longer. TVhenproperly prepared its blanched shoots are delicious; they have theirown chara
RM2AWGBYKExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . nd many of thetips were green from exposure to sunlight above the mounds. Though slightly dis-colored, these were of good quality when prepared for the table. 4 BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. There is no doubt that the uclo is worthy of adding to our list ofspring vegetables, for it is easily grown, its shoots are readilyblanched, and it requires little care. A patch of it can be forcedevery spring for at least six years, and probably much longer. TVhenproperly prepared its blanched shoots are delicious; they have theirown chara
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . ntile which has one end plugged with a cement cap orcovering. The shoots coming up inside of the tile are well blanched,and this method has the advantage of making it possible to examinethe shoots at any time to see how they are coming along. It hasat least one disadvantage, however, in that the shoots have a tendencyto leaf out and produce a number of unopened leafstalks which take EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 11 away from the robust growth of the shoots. A method which hasobviated this defect in using tiles is to put around each hill a deepbox or s
RM2AWGAPJExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . ntile which has one end plugged with a cement cap orcovering. The shoots coming up inside of the tile are well blanched,and this method has the advantage of making it possible to examinethe shoots at any time to see how they are coming along. It hasat least one disadvantage, however, in that the shoots have a tendencyto leaf out and produce a number of unopened leafstalks which take EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 11 away from the robust growth of the shoots. A method which hasobviated this defect in using tiles is to put around each hill a deepbox or s
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . e of propagating a horticultural strain, the seedling methodof propagation is undoubtedly the best. Where, however, it is desired to perpetuate a particular strain,udo plants may be grown from cuttings of the green shoots. To do EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 9 this, terminal shoots should be taken when they are three-eighthsof an inch in diameter and cut 5 inches or more long, care beingtaken to make the cut just below one of the joints, or nodes, in orderto insure that the cuttings form a proper callus. In California, thehead gardener of the State Un
RM2AWGAYBExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . e of propagating a horticultural strain, the seedling methodof propagation is undoubtedly the best. Where, however, it is desired to perpetuate a particular strain,udo plants may be grown from cuttings of the green shoots. To do EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 9 this, terminal shoots should be taken when they are three-eighthsof an inch in diameter and cut 5 inches or more long, care beingtaken to make the cut just below one of the joints, or nodes, in orderto insure that the cuttings form a proper callus. In California, thehead gardener of the State Un
Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . t is a simple culinary practice to boil strong-flavored vegetablesin two (or even three) waters, and this is advisable as a generalrecommendation, although when used for soup it does not appearto be always necessary. An hours stay in ice water will removethis resin from the shoots, provided they are cut into thin slices orshavings. Little is known regarding the food value of udo further than thatanalyses show it to have about the same dietetic value as celeryor asparagus. The Chinese, who are prone to ascribe mysteriousproperties to many of th
RM2AWGAJRExperiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . t is a simple culinary practice to boil strong-flavored vegetablesin two (or even three) waters, and this is advisable as a generalrecommendation, although when used for soup it does not appearto be always necessary. An hours stay in ice water will removethis resin from the shoots, provided they are cut into thin slices orshavings. Little is known regarding the food value of udo further than thatanalyses show it to have about the same dietetic value as celeryor asparagus. The Chinese, who are prone to ascribe mysteriousproperties to many of th