Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . into the middle of May in the latitudeof Washington, D. C, which will be a great advantage, and it isprobable that other characteristics will be discovered as experimentersbecome familiar with these strains. BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. METHOD OF CULTURE. Much remains to be done in the working out of the most inexpen-sive methods of cultivating udo. Conditions of labor and materialsare so different here from those in Japan that the methods of theJapanese have to be adapted to our own circumstances. The climatein America, at le

Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . into the middle of May in the latitudeof Washington, D. C, which will be a great advantage, and it isprobable that other characteristics will be discovered as experimentersbecome familiar with these strains. BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. METHOD OF CULTURE. Much remains to be done in the working out of the most inexpen-sive methods of cultivating udo. Conditions of labor and materialsare so different here from those in Japan that the methods of theJapanese have to be adapted to our own circumstances. The climatein America, at le Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AWGB2T

File size:

7.2 MB (289.6 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1971 x 1268 px | 33.4 x 21.5 cm | 13.1 x 8.5 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . into the middle of May in the latitudeof Washington, D. C, which will be a great advantage, and it isprobable that other characteristics will be discovered as experimentersbecome familiar with these strains. BULLETIN 84, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. METHOD OF CULTURE. Much remains to be done in the working out of the most inexpen-sive methods of cultivating udo. Conditions of labor and materialsare so different here from those in Japan that the methods of theJapanese have to be adapted to our own circumstances. The climatein America, at least in the Eastern States, is so different from thatof Japan that methods of forcing used there are not applicable here. As a home garden vegetable the experience of the past 10 yearsindicates that the udo. when once started, is a very easy plant togrow. Amateurs have experienced some difficulty in growing udofrom seed, but anyone with greenhouse or cold-frame facilities shouldhave no difficulty with fresh seed if it is sown one-fourth inch deep. Fig. 7.—Young udo plants as distributed to experimenters. Seedlings from seed plantedin February should attain this size by the first of June. in March or April in what is known as screened potting soil, consist-ing of 1 part loam, 1 part leaf soil or mold, and 1 part sand. In twoor three weeks the seeds should be up. From the flats, the youngseedlings can be planted out in the ground as soon as they are 3 or 4inches high, or they can be potted off and later set out in the field(fig. 7). Seedlings started in boxes or flats in March will oftengrow ± or even G feet tall the first year and will flower freely if notprevented from doing so, as they should be, by cutting or pinchingout the round flower buds in midsummer. Where the question isnot one of propagating a horticultural strain, the seedling methodof propagation is undoubtedly the best. Where, however, it is desired to perpetuate a particular strain, udo plants may be grown from c

Save up to 70% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts