Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . e of propagating a horticultural strain, the seedling methodof propagation is undoubtedly the best. Where, however, it is desired to perpetuate a particular strain,udo plants may be grown from cuttings of the green shoots. To do EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 9 this, terminal shoots should be taken when they are three-eighthsof an inch in diameter and cut 5 inches or more long, care beingtaken to make the cut just below one of the joints, or nodes, in orderto insure that the cuttings form a proper callus. In California, thehead gardener of the State Un

Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . e of propagating a horticultural strain, the seedling methodof propagation is undoubtedly the best. Where, however, it is desired to perpetuate a particular strain,udo plants may be grown from cuttings of the green shoots. To do EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 9 this, terminal shoots should be taken when they are three-eighthsof an inch in diameter and cut 5 inches or more long, care beingtaken to make the cut just below one of the joints, or nodes, in orderto insure that the cuttings form a proper callus. In California, thehead gardener of the State Un Stock Photo
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Experiments with udo, the new Japanese vegetable . e of propagating a horticultural strain, the seedling methodof propagation is undoubtedly the best. Where, however, it is desired to perpetuate a particular strain, udo plants may be grown from cuttings of the green shoots. To do EXPERIMENTS WITH UDO. 9 this, terminal shoots should be taken when they are three-eighthsof an inch in diameter and cut 5 inches or more long, care beingtaken to make the cut just below one of the joints, or nodes, in orderto insure that the cuttings form a proper callus. In California, thehead gardener of the State University, Mr. Mansell, got 80 per centof his cuttings so made to grow satisfactorily. He took them inlate summer or early fall and put them in clean sand. The writerhas rooted cuttings of this kind in garden soil in Maryland. While it is possible that cuttings of the root might grow, thewriters experiments with them have been failures, at least unlessa bud from the base of the stem was included in the cutting, inwhich case it 2rew satisfactorilv.. Fig. 8.—General view of one-half acre plantation of udo at the Yarrow Field Station, near Roekville, Md. The plants set from thumb pots in the spring here averagedfrom 2S to 4 feet high in late summer. The udo is a coarse feeder, with great succulent roots which travelrapidly through loose, rich soil. They can consume astonishingamounts of nitrogenous manures and turn them into succulent shoots.Planting udo on poor, dry lands is not recommended, for, thoughit would probably live, it would make no growth there. A speciallyconstructed bed, such as is often made for asparagus, is, however, notnecessary. Three and a half feet apart is close enough for plants of the udo tostand, for as they grow older the crowns become at least a foot across.On very rich soil the writer has found t feet not too great a distance.When grown even with this space between them the plants will toucheach other and make horse cultivation impossible late in the su

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