. English: n 1962 many miniatures were found in the store of the State Archaeology, Museum in Hyderabad, The Andhra paintings of Ramayana, were found by the scholar Padmasree Jagdish Mittal while he was helping the Museum in classifying undisplayed collections. Kept in bundles along with the other miniatures these works were not classified by chronological sequence or by schools. A leading authority of Indian miniatures and folk bronzes, Jagdish Mittal had attained Diploma from Visva Bharati, Santiniketan. Founder of the Jagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum of Indian Art, Hyderabad - a Public Chari

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. English: n 1962 many miniatures were found in the store of the State Archaeology, Museum in Hyderabad, The Andhra paintings of Ramayana, were found by the scholar Padmasree Jagdish Mittal while he was helping the Museum in classifying undisplayed collections. Kept in bundles along with the other miniatures these works were not classified by chronological sequence or by schools. A leading authority of Indian miniatures and folk bronzes, Jagdish Mittal had attained Diploma from Visva Bharati, Santiniketan. Founder of the Jagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum of Indian Art, Hyderabad - a Public Chari Stock Photo
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. English: n 1962 many miniatures were found in the store of the State Archaeology, Museum in Hyderabad, The Andhra paintings of Ramayana, were found by the scholar Padmasree Jagdish Mittal while he was helping the Museum in classifying undisplayed collections. Kept in bundles along with the other miniatures these works were not classified by chronological sequence or by schools. A leading authority of Indian miniatures and folk bronzes, Jagdish Mittal had attained Diploma from Visva Bharati, Santiniketan. Founder of the Jagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum of Indian Art, Hyderabad - a Public Chari
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Image ID: MW1CG2
. English: n 1962 many miniatures were found in the store of the State Archaeology, Museum in Hyderabad, The Andhra paintings of Ramayana, were found by the scholar Padmasree Jagdish Mittal while he was helping the Museum in classifying undisplayed collections. Kept in bundles along with the other miniatures these works were not classified by chronological sequence or by schools. A leading authority of Indian miniatures and folk bronzes, Jagdish Mittal had attained Diploma from Visva Bharati, Santiniketan. Founder of the Jagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum of Indian Art, Hyderabad - a Public Charitable Trust since 1976, the Museum is known for its collection, built through the years. In the preface of the publication - Andhra Paintings of the Ramayana he writes “I was invited in 1962 by the Archaeology and Museums to evaluate and date the miniature paintings in the State Museum Hyderabad.' The Ramayana paintings were first noticed by him in the store, according to him these were acquired by the Museum thirty years ago. Reflecting upon the emergence of miniature painting in the South, Jagdish Mittal writes “The Hindu courts in South India engaged themselves mainly in temple building and enriching their temples and palaces with sculptures and murals.” He mentions “Only three palm leaf manuscripts were of the early 12th century have yet come to light from the South. They were painted at Mudbidri in South Kanara (Mysore) and illustrate the texts of the manuscripts, Shatakhandagama, mahabandha and Kashyapahuda, dealing with Jain philosophy. The illustrations are actually an extension of the western Indian style in the South with some characteristic features like suggestion for volume, rounded forms use of modeling and profuse use of scrolls. He informs “However miniature painting was completely unknown in the South and notable specimens, both of individual miniatures and manuscript illustrations are coming to light especially from Mysore and the Tanjavur area but n

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