Engineering and Contracting . f morethan one row of slabs, such as two paral-lel rows, the slabs would be concreted thewhole way up the slope between two longnotched or stepped beams, the slabs beingseparated by a horizontal space. Fig. 3 shows a number of slabs in courseof construction. Two sets of woodenbeams d are fixed in position by means ofthe iron stakes a. Each set of large-sizedbeams d serves for the concrete of twoslabs at a time. In order to keep the Fig, 2.—Showing Two Lowest Steps Con-creted, and Covered by Boards. shown ready to lay the sheet of expandedmetal reinforcement in the

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Engineering and Contracting . f morethan one row of slabs, such as two paral-lel rows, the slabs would be concreted thewhole way up the slope between two longnotched or stepped beams, the slabs beingseparated by a horizontal space. Fig. 3 shows a number of slabs in courseof construction. Two sets of woodenbeams d are fixed in position by means ofthe iron stakes a. Each set of large-sizedbeams d serves for the concrete of twoslabs at a time. In order to keep the Fig, 2.—Showing Two Lowest Steps Con-creted, and Covered by Boards. shown ready to lay the sheet of expandedmetal reinforcement in the
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Image ID: 2AJBCCY
Engineering and Contracting . f morethan one row of slabs, such as two paral-lel rows, the slabs would be concreted thewhole way up the slope between two longnotched or stepped beams, the slabs beingseparated by a horizontal space. Fig. 3 shows a number of slabs in courseof construction. Two sets of woodenbeams d are fixed in position by means ofthe iron stakes a. Each set of large-sizedbeams d serves for the concrete of twoslabs at a time. In order to keep the Fig, 2.—Showing Two Lowest Steps Con-creted, and Covered by Boards. shown ready to lay the sheet of expandedmetal reinforcement in the lower half. As soon as the slabs have hardened suf-ficiently, trenches are dug all lound theslabs to a depth of 15 cm. to 20 cm. be-low the underside thereof. Iron rods arelaid in these trenches so as to form con-tinuous reinforcement quite independentof the slabs. The foot is first constructed,and against this the sloping wooden beamsd^ are then put up, being laid on top ofthe slabs, leaving open part /> of the latter.. Fig. 3—Sketch Showing Trench andForm for Sloping Reinforced Con-crete Beam. These beams rf* are also kept in positionby means of iron stakes a, and measure280 cm. by 10 cm. by 12.5 cm. The beamsare also provided with handles wi^. Fig. 4 shows the method of covering thefacing slabs with boards r after the con-creting is finished. If the slope is notsteep and there are no tidal difficultiesthese boards can be left aside. The con-crete must now be carefully smoothed andcovered with straw or similar material tokeep off the sun. The reinforcement of the concrete fram-ing beams, which are T-shaped, consists of iron bars 5/16 in. dia. placed near thebottom or underside, and sheets of ex-panded metal No. 15, at the top in thehead of the T, carefully cut to fit exactlybetween the wooden beams, thus reinforc-ing the parts that overlap the slabs. Immediately after the hardening of theconcrete of the topmost beam the spacebehind is filled in with earth. It should b