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. Economic entomology for the farmer and fruit-grower [microform] : and for use as a text-book in agricultural schools and colleges . to penetrate the webs and come into direct contact with the larvae. Sometimes insects of this series are not confined to green vegetation, as in the case of the " clover-hay worm," Asopia costalis, which attacks the dry or partially dry product, webbing it up and causing more or Fig. 356. less injury. Its near ally, Pyralis farinalis, may be found in barns or bins where grain is carelessly stored, and the caterpil- lars make little tubes, formed partia

. Economic entomology for the farmer and fruit-grower [microform] : and for use as a text-book in agricultural schools and colleges . to penetrate the webs and come into direct contact with the larvae. Sometimes insects of this series are not confined to green vegetation, as in the case of the " clover-hay worm," Asopia costalis, which attacks the dry or partially dry product, webbing it up and causing more or Fig. 356. less injury. Its near ally, Pyralis farinalis, may be found in barns or bins where grain is carelessly stored, and the caterpil- lars make little tubes, formed partia Stock Photo
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The Bookworm Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

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MAAB6D

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2406 x 2078 px | 40.7 x 35.2 cm | 16 x 13.9 inches | 150dpi

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. Economic entomology for the farmer and fruit-grower [microform] : and for use as a text-book in agricultural schools and colleges . to penetrate the webs and come into direct contact with the larvae. Sometimes insects of this series are not confined to green vegetation, as in the case of the " clover-hay worm," Asopia costalis, which attacks the dry or partially dry product, webbing it up and causing more or Fig. 356. less injury. Its near ally, Pyralis farinalis, may be found in barns or bins where grain is carelessly stored, and the caterpil- lars make little tubes, formed partially of silk, partially of fragments of the grain and even of en- tire kernels, upon which they feed. Rarely, how- ever, are they abundant enough to do serious in- jury, and as against both cleanliness will go far, while bisulphide of carbon will readily destroy the larvae. As against the "clover-hay worm," nothing is better than to feed up clean from year to year. Never put new hay upon old, and if stacked outside, lay upon rails so as to get ventilation underneath. Salting the first two or three feet has also been recommended, and will probably be effective. In the PhycitincE there are many sombre-colored little moths, usually of some gray tint, with rather narrow fore and broad hind wings. The insects rest with the wings closely folded around the body, the head a little elevated, and the palpi project- ing forward, giving them rather an impertinent appearance. The caterpillars are largely internal feeders, attacking fruits in many cases, sometimes living in the stems of plants, sometimes spin- ning up among leaves, in rare cases feeding openly. Occasion- ally they make a case or sac which they carry about with them, and in which they are more or less protected. We have several more or less troublesome species that are The clover-hay worm, i and 2 ; its cocoon at 3 ; the pupa at 4 ; the moths, Asopia costalis, at 5 and 6 ; at 7 the tubes made by the larvae.