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Economic entomology for the farmer and fruit-grower : and for use as a text-book in agricultural schools and colleges . case or sac which they carry about with them,and in which they are more or less protected. We have several more or less troublesome species that are The clover-hay worm, i and 2 ; ils cocoon at 3 ;the pupa at 4 ; the moths, Asopia costalis, at 5 and6; at 7 the tubes made by the larvae. THE IXSECT WORLD. ^n rather difficult to deal with. One of these is the Mineola vaccinii,or cranberrj-fruit worm, which lives in the berry itself, feed-ing in the seed-capsule, causing the frui

Economic entomology for the farmer and fruit-grower : and for use as a text-book in agricultural schools and colleges . case or sac which they carry about with them,and in which they are more or less protected. We have several more or less troublesome species that are The clover-hay worm, i and 2 ; ils cocoon at 3 ;the pupa at 4 ; the moths, Asopia costalis, at 5 and6; at 7 the tubes made by the larvae. THE IXSECT WORLD. ^n rather difficult to deal with. One of these is the Mineola vaccinii,or cranberrj-fruit worm, which lives in the berry itself, feed-ing in the seed-capsule, causing the frui Stock Photo
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Economic entomology for the farmer and fruit-grower : and for use as a text-book in agricultural schools and colleges . case or sac which they carry about with them,and in which they are more or less protected. We have several more or less troublesome species that are The clover-hay worm, i and 2 ; ils cocoon at 3 ;the pupa at 4 ; the moths, Asopia costalis, at 5 and6; at 7 the tubes made by the larvae. THE IXSECT WORLD. ^n rather difficult to deal with. One of these is the Mineola vaccinii,or cranberrj-fruit worm, which lives in the berry itself, feed-ing in the seed-capsule, causing the fruit to redden up prema-turely, and then to dry and shrivel on the vine. A singlecaterpillar may eat into every berry ui)on a fruit stem in thecourse of its existence, then descends to the ground, andamong the leaves and rub-bish spins a tough little co-coon in which the pupawinters safely, even if cov-ered by water. The eggsare laid about the middle ofJuly, singly, on the berrieswhere the blossoms havedropped off, under one ofthe little triangular flaps.Once the larvae are in theberries there is no way of Fic^- 357-. Craiiberr>-fruit worm, Mineola vaccinii.—a, cranberry on which [b, c) the eggs are laid ;d, larva ; e,f, pupa and its tip ; g, cocoon ; h,moth. getting at them, and, practi-cally, the only method of reducing their numbers i.s to pick theberries as early as may be, being careful to get in all that areinfested. By sorting promptly these can be destroyed beforethe larvae leave them, lessening greatly the number of moths forthe following year. The insect is much more troublesome inNew England than in New Jersey or in the northwestern marshes. Nearly allied, but with totally different habits, is the Mineolaindiginel/a, or rascal apple-leaf crumpler, so called from itshabit of making irregular, crumpled cases on the apple leavesupon which the insect feeds. It is rather easily reached, where itbecomes troublesome, by the arsenical sprays, and in orchardswhere spraying