. Distribution, habitat, and calling season of the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) along the lower Illinois River. Frogs. September 1988 Brown and Rose: Illinois Chorus Frog (Pstudacns strecken illinoensis) Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis. We suspect that the center of operations for the rescue station was located on the southern end of the lake on the east side be- cause the 1928 Meredosia quadrangle map shows a number of buildings in that area. Weed (1923) noted that the specimen he collected (Figure 2) had a "short, thick, body," and he referred it to the

. Distribution, habitat, and calling season of the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) along the lower Illinois River. Frogs. September 1988 Brown and Rose: Illinois Chorus Frog (Pstudacns strecken illinoensis) Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis. We suspect that the center of operations for the rescue station was located on the southern end of the lake on the east side be- cause the 1928 Meredosia quadrangle map shows a number of buildings in that area. Weed (1923) noted that the specimen he collected (Figure 2) had a "short, thick, body," and he referred it to the  Stock Photo
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Paul Fearn / Alamy Stock Photo

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RCCY5G

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1919 x 1303 px | 32.5 x 22.1 cm | 12.8 x 8.7 inches | 150dpi

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. Distribution, habitat, and calling season of the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) along the lower Illinois River. Frogs. September 1988 Brown and Rose: Illinois Chorus Frog (Pstudacns strecken illinoensis) Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis. We suspect that the center of operations for the rescue station was located on the southern end of the lake on the east side be- cause the 1928 Meredosia quadrangle map shows a number of buildings in that area. Weed (1923) noted that the specimen he collected (Figure 2) had a "short, thick, body," and he referred it to the species Pseudacris fenarum (upland chorus frog). He also stated that it corresponded well with Cope's (1889) first color description for Chorophilus feriarum brachyphonus from near the Kiskiminitas River in west- ern Pennsylvania. Walker (1932) examined Weed's specimen during the course of research in Ohio that recognized the mountain chorus frog Pseudacris brachyphona as a valid species. Walker stated that the specimen was not brachyphona, but he did not identify Weed's specimen to species, possibly because no name was available for the specimen at that lime. The fol- lowing year (1933), Wright and Wright described Pseudacris strecken (Strecker's chorus frog) as a new species from the southern United States. Walker then recognized that Weed's specimen was P. streckeri, and he later encouraged Philip W. Smith (late former Head of the Section of Faunistic Surveys and Insect Identification at the Illinois Natural History Survey) to investigate the Meredosia area (Smith 1951). Weed's specimen (FMNH 3266) was examined by Smith (and later by L.E. Brown in the early 1970s and again in 1985). The specimen is a small (snout-vent length = 28 mm, measured by L.E. Brown in 1985), sexually immature subadult that was emaciated when originally preserved (Figure 2). Because of its size and condition, it is superficially more similar in appear- ance to Pseudacris brachyphona and P. triseriata

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