. Distribution, habitat, and calling season of the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) along the lower Illinois River. Frogs. Illinois Natural History Survey Biological Notes No. 132 the means for locating Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis. The mating call is a short whistle that is repeated rela- tively rapidly (Figure 1), and it could be detected from a distance of at least 2.1 km (1.3 mi) when the wind was not blowing strongly (Brown 1984). We estab- lished listening stations at or within hearing range of bodies of water that could serve as potential chorusing sites on th

. Distribution, habitat, and calling season of the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) along the lower Illinois River. Frogs. Illinois Natural History Survey Biological Notes No. 132 the means for locating Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis. The mating call is a short whistle that is repeated rela- tively rapidly (Figure 1), and it could be detected from a distance of at least 2.1 km (1.3 mi) when the wind was not blowing strongly (Brown 1984). We estab- lished listening stations at or within hearing range of bodies of water that could serve as potential chorusing sites on th Stock Photo
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. Distribution, habitat, and calling season of the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) along the lower Illinois River. Frogs. Illinois Natural History Survey Biological Notes No. 132 the means for locating Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis. The mating call is a short whistle that is repeated rela- tively rapidly (Figure 1), and it could be detected from a distance of at least 2.1 km (1.3 mi) when the wind was not blowing strongly (Brown 1984). We estab- lished listening stations at or within hearing range of bodies of water that could serve as potential chorusing sites on the floodplain of the Illinois River in Scott, Morgan, Greene, eastern Pike, and southern Cass counties. Over the course of the study, 748 stops (not including stops for triangulation) were made at 109 listening stations. A mean of 25.8 stations was visited per evening in the field (range = 9—51 stations). Be- cause of time constraints, not all stations were visited in a given evening. After the locations of choruses were pinpointed, the sites were revisited during day- light hours to examine the habitat. Results Distribution Historical background. Alfred C. Weed, former Curator of Ichthyolog)' at the Field Museum of Natu- ral History in Chicago, collected the first Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis in Illinois in September 1922 from the bottom of the hatchery well at the Meredosia Fish Hatchery in Morgan County in the northern part of our study area (Weed 1923). As no hatchery is shown on the 1928 Meredosia quadrangle map (U.S. Geolog- ical Survey), we tried to determine its location by con- tacting fisheries personnel. Maurice A. Whitacre, former State Fish Culturist with the Illinois Depart- ment of Conservation, collected information on the history of the state hatchery system shortly before his retirement, and in his opinion no official state-owned hatchery ever existed at Meredosia. He explained the misnomer as follows. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, the levee syst

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