People receive food from the ACT Alliance on April 7, 2017, in Rumading, a village in South Sudan's war-plagued Lol State.
RMP2PG87People receive food from the ACT Alliance on April 7, 2017, in Rumading, a village in South Sudan's war-plagued Lol State.
Internally displaced Sudanese wait for food, water, and health care at Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin (SUDAN CONFLICT)
RM2D1B22EInternally displaced Sudanese wait for food, water, and health care at Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin (SUDAN CONFLICT)
U.N. Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes (R) listens during his visit to a hospital for internally displaced persons at Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught ti
RM2D1D7R1U.N. Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes (R) listens during his visit to a hospital for internally displaced persons at Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught ti
U.N. Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes (L) chats with internally displaced Sudanese women and children at Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times.  REUTER
RM2D2YTE0U.N. Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes (L) chats with internally displaced Sudanese women and children at Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times. REUTER
Internally displaced Sudanese eat tree leaves during the visit of U.N Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes in Akobo town in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times. REUTER
RM2D2MGCWInternally displaced Sudanese eat tree leaves during the visit of U.N Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes in Akobo town in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times. REUTER
An internally displaced Sudanese eats tree leaves during the visit of U.N Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes in Akobo town in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times.  R
RM2D1X9XPAn internally displaced Sudanese eats tree leaves during the visit of U.N Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes in Akobo town in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in fraught times. R
An internally displaced Sudanese woman sits in her hospital bed in Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009, during the visit of U.N. Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in f
RM2D1HG2PAn internally displaced Sudanese woman sits in her hospital bed in Akobo camp in south Sudan's Jonglei state May 8, 2009, during the visit of U.N. Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes. Tribal violence in south Sudan that has killed hundreds of people in recent weeks is worrying and the region cannot afford another war, Holmes said on Friday. Attacks stemming from disputes over cattle have escalated in recent months in south Sudan between two rival ethnic groups in an area where livestock are prized by southern pastoralists and represent wealth, status and stability in f
A displaced man recuperates from his injuries on the floor of a United Nations hospital at Tomping camp, where some 15,000 displaced people who fled their homes are sheltered by the UN, near South Sudan's capital Juba January 7, 2014. REUTERS/James Akena (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT HEALTH)
RM2CYMCJJA displaced man recuperates from his injuries on the floor of a United Nations hospital at Tomping camp, where some 15,000 displaced people who fled their homes are sheltered by the UN, near South Sudan's capital Juba January 7, 2014. REUTERS/James Akena (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT HEALTH)
Displaced men recuperate from their injuries as they rest on the floor at a United Nations hospital in Tomping camp, where some 15,000 displaced people who fled their homes are sheltered by the UN, near South Sudan's capital Juba January 7, 2014. REUTERS/James Akena (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT HEALTH)
RM2CWW9HDDisplaced men recuperate from their injuries as they rest on the floor at a United Nations hospital in Tomping camp, where some 15,000 displaced people who fled their homes are sheltered by the UN, near South Sudan's capital Juba January 7, 2014. REUTERS/James Akena (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT HEALTH)
Displaced families are seen camped inside Tomping UN base near Juba international airport December 24, 2013. Clashes between rival groups of soldiers in Juba a week ago have spread across the country, which won its independence from Sudan in 2011 after decades of war. President Salva Kiir, from South Sudan's Dinka ethnic group, has accused former Vice President Riek Machar, a Nuer whom he dismissed in July, of trying to launch a coup. Machar dismissed the charge but has since said he is commanding troops fighting the government. REUTERS/James Akena (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
RM2CXMMWGDisplaced families are seen camped inside Tomping UN base near Juba international airport December 24, 2013. Clashes between rival groups of soldiers in Juba a week ago have spread across the country, which won its independence from Sudan in 2011 after decades of war. President Salva Kiir, from South Sudan's Dinka ethnic group, has accused former Vice President Riek Machar, a Nuer whom he dismissed in July, of trying to launch a coup. Machar dismissed the charge but has since said he is commanding troops fighting the government. REUTERS/James Akena (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
Internally displaced people wave to their relatives from a bus in a transport convoy bound for Unity state in south Sudan, in Khartoum October 28, 2010. Sudan's north-south civil war, which was Africa's longest civil war, pitted Khartoum's Islamist government against rebels who mostly follow Christianity and traditional beliefs, and culminated in a 2005 north-south peace deal. These IDPs have lived in north Sudan for 21 years. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY TRANSPORT)
RM2CX34F7Internally displaced people wave to their relatives from a bus in a transport convoy bound for Unity state in south Sudan, in Khartoum October 28, 2010. Sudan's north-south civil war, which was Africa's longest civil war, pitted Khartoum's Islamist government against rebels who mostly follow Christianity and traditional beliefs, and culminated in a 2005 north-south peace deal. These IDPs have lived in north Sudan for 21 years. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY TRANSPORT)
Maymona, 28, from Sudan sits on a bed at her home in Juba, South Sudan June 8, 2014. Maymona is from Sudan's Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan state. The state remained part of Sudan after the secession of the South three years ago, and has been the scene of clashes between rebels and the Sudanese military. Maymona fled the restive area for Juba, the capital of South Sudan. She now lives there with other people from her home region. She is studying Education at university, and is in her second year. June 20 is World Refugee Day, an occasion that draws attention to those who have been displaced
RM2E6CP6RMaymona, 28, from Sudan sits on a bed at her home in Juba, South Sudan June 8, 2014. Maymona is from Sudan's Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan state. The state remained part of Sudan after the secession of the South three years ago, and has been the scene of clashes between rebels and the Sudanese military. Maymona fled the restive area for Juba, the capital of South Sudan. She now lives there with other people from her home region. She is studying Education at university, and is in her second year. June 20 is World Refugee Day, an occasion that draws attention to those who have been displaced