Diseases of the throat and nasal passages; a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of affections of the pharynx, sophagus, trachea, larynx, and nares . ged in debris or in fragments. The ary-tenoids are sometimes discharged in mass, and even the ne-crosed cricoid has been expectorated in one piece. All thecartilages are liable to this perichondritis, the arytenoid carti-lages especially, and the cricoid, and thyroid also, less fre-quently. As the arytenoid cartilages are the levers by whichthe vocal cords are moved, the free outward and inwardmotion of these structures is impeded by tumefaction

- Image ID: 2AXJHNY
Diseases of the throat and nasal passages; a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of affections of the pharynx, sophagus, trachea, larynx, and nares . ged in debris or in fragments. The ary-tenoids are sometimes discharged in mass, and even the ne-crosed cricoid has been expectorated in one piece. All thecartilages are liable to this perichondritis, the arytenoid carti-lages especially, and the cricoid, and thyroid also, less fre-quently. As the arytenoid cartilages are the levers by whichthe vocal cords are moved, the free outward and inwardmotion of these structures is impeded by tumefaction
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Image ID: 2AXJHNY
Diseases of the throat and nasal passages; a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of affections of the pharynx, sophagus, trachea, larynx, and nares . ged in debris or in fragments. The ary-tenoids are sometimes discharged in mass, and even the ne-crosed cricoid has been expectorated in one piece. All thecartilages are liable to this perichondritis, the arytenoid carti-lages especially, and the cricoid, and thyroid also, less fre-quently. As the arytenoid cartilages are the levers by whichthe vocal cords are moved, the free outward and inwardmotion of these structures is impeded by tumefaction, thusimpairing the voice ; and complete aphonia usually ensues ontheir destruction. Aphonia is not a necessary result of loss ofthe arytenoid cartilages, as inflammatory adhesions may weldthe vocal cords, as it were, to the mucous membrane, whichthen, with an intervening deposit of organized products ofinfiltration, answers the purpose of an imperfect cartilage.Involvement of the arytenoid cartilage is recognized laryngo-scopically by the cedematous swelling of the parts (Fig. 123),usually associated with some point of ulceration in the inter-. FlG. 123.—Perichondritis of arytenoid cartil- Fig. 124.—Abscess from perichondritis of ary- ! in tuberculosis. Ulceration in inter-aryte- tenoid, projecting above the glottis. noid fold arytenoid fold or in the parts beneath the glottis. The peri-chondritis of the arytenoid frequently leads to abscess at itsbase (Fig. 124), which is recognized by its supra-glottic posi-tion, and which frequently discharges at the junction of thevocal process with the vocal cord. The cricoid cartilage suffers sometimes primarily and some-times as an extension from the disease in the arytenoids. Thecondition is recognized laryngoscopically by a swollen or ul-cerated appearance of the part, as the case may be, within the

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