. Discovery. Science. DISCOVERY 261 to the west of Graham Land ; by the Deuischland, in the Weddell Sea ; by the Endurance of Sir Ernest Shackleton's 1914 expedition, also in the Weddell Sea, but on a course considerably to the west of that of the Deuischland ; and by the Aurora of the same expedi- tion in the Ross Sea. The ice circulation is thus best known in the Weddell Sea, a great bight extending to nearly 78° south latitude, south of the Atlantic. James Weddell, who discovered this sea, reached a latitude of 74° 15' S. in February 1823 with no ice in sight, but otherwise the reputation o

- Image ID: RCDC0F
. Discovery. Science. DISCOVERY 261 to the west of Graham Land ; by the Deuischland, in the Weddell Sea ; by the Endurance of Sir Ernest Shackleton's 1914 expedition, also in the Weddell Sea, but on a course considerably to the west of that of the Deuischland ; and by the Aurora of the same expedi- tion in the Ross Sea. The ice circulation is thus best known in the Weddell Sea, a great bight extending to nearly 78° south latitude, south of the Atlantic. James Weddell, who discovered this sea, reached a latitude of 74° 15' S. in February 1823 with no ice in sight, but otherwise the reputation o
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Image ID: RCDC0F
. Discovery. Science. DISCOVERY 261 to the west of Graham Land ; by the Deuischland, in the Weddell Sea ; by the Endurance of Sir Ernest Shackleton's 1914 expedition, also in the Weddell Sea, but on a course considerably to the west of that of the Deuischland ; and by the Aurora of the same expedi- tion in the Ross Sea. The ice circulation is thus best known in the Weddell Sea, a great bight extending to nearly 78° south latitude, south of the Atlantic. James Weddell, who discovered this sea, reached a latitude of 74° 15' S. in February 1823 with no ice in sight, but otherwise the reputation of the sea for ice is bad. Bruce, who discovered land on the How the " Endurance " was Frozen in The Endurance left South Georgia in December 1914, the intention being to form a base near the land dis- covered by Filchner. Ice was encountered near the South Sandwich Islands, about lat. 58° S., and the course was set to the east to try to get round the ice, but as it seemed to extend indefinitely in that direc- tion, the ship's head was turned south a few days later. For the next month the ship was forced through the pack, which most of the time was fairly close, and on January 10, 1915, Coats Land was sighted. The. -THE ENDURANCE SET IX Tin: ICi;. By courtesy of William Hcincmanti, eastern side of the sea in 1904, which he called Coats Land, was prevented by ice from reaching a high southern latitude, and attempts by Larsen and Nor- denskjold to penetrate very far south on the western, or Graham Land, side of the sea were much hampered by heavy pack. In fact, in the south-west part of the sea, land has not yet been sighted. The German expedition under Filchner attained a latitude of 77° 40' and actually made a landing, but finding no suitable place for winter-quarters, made their way north again, and were caught by the ice in March 1913, and after a drift of eight months, were released in lat. 63° S. ice was thick and heavy off the land, but there was open water a