Dinanderie; a history and description of mediæval art work in copper, brass and bronze . ed in the shape of beasts, had analmost endless variety, not only imitating the appearance ofknown animals, but copied from the indescribable creatureswith which the beastiaries of the Middle Ages were replete.At times, however, some attempt to imitate nature was made,and not unsuccessfully, as in the very fine aquamanille inthe British Museum in the form of a mounted knight infull armour, which was found near Hexham, and is assumedto be English work of the early fourteenth century. It may bementioned that

Dinanderie; a history and description of mediæval art work in copper, brass and bronze . ed in the shape of beasts, had analmost endless variety, not only imitating the appearance ofknown animals, but copied from the indescribable creatureswith which the beastiaries of the Middle Ages were replete.At times, however, some attempt to imitate nature was made,and not unsuccessfully, as in the very fine aquamanille inthe British Museum in the form of a mounted knight infull armour, which was found near Hexham, and is assumedto be English work of the early fourteenth century. It may bementioned that Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AXJ2JT

File size:

7.1 MB (367.9 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1558 x 1604 px | 26.4 x 27.2 cm | 10.4 x 10.7 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Dinanderie; a history and description of mediæval art work in copper, brass and bronze . ed in the shape of beasts, had analmost endless variety, not only imitating the appearance ofknown animals, but copied from the indescribable creatureswith which the beastiaries of the Middle Ages were replete.At times, however, some attempt to imitate nature was made, and not unsuccessfully, as in the very fine aquamanille inthe British Museum in the form of a mounted knight infull armour, which was found near Hexham, and is assumedto be English work of the early fourteenth century. It may bementioned that this figure and many others of the aquamanilleswhich aim at imitating nature, singularly resemble in style muchof the brass casting which is carried on to this day at Vizaga-patam in southern India, as is shown by the illustrations in Sir M 178 DINANDERIE George Birdwoods Industrial Arts of India. Of these animal-shaped ewers we give three in the form of lions from theVictoria and Albert Museum (Plate XXXVIL), one Germanof the fourteenth century, and another Flemish of the fifteenth. Fig. 57.—Aquamanille, Victoria and Albert Museum century, and a third (Fig. 57), which has its head so twisted thatit must have been difficult to pour straight from its mouth ;and a fourth, of a man mounted on a lion, German work of thefourteenth century, from the British Museum (Plate XXIV.).It will be noticed with these unmounted beasts a handle was II? mm

Save up to 70% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts