. Development and activities of roots of crop plants; a study in crop ecology. Roots (Botany); Plant ecology; Crops and climate. 72 Development and Activities of Roots of Crop Plants. (at 2 to 2.7 feet), gave the plants a root development quite out of proportion to the tops and markedly different from those of more moist soil. This root development agrees with earlier studies of cereal crops, including winter- grown varieties, and in many respects with that of the native vegetation of the short-grass plains (c/. Weaver, 1920). Summary of Environment and Crop Development at All Stations, 1920.

- Image ID: PFA947
. Development and activities of roots of crop plants; a study in crop ecology. Roots (Botany); Plant ecology; Crops and climate. 72 Development and Activities of Roots of Crop Plants. (at 2 to 2.7 feet), gave the plants a root development quite out of proportion to the tops and markedly different from those of more moist soil. This root development agrees with earlier studies of cereal crops, including winter- grown varieties, and in many respects with that of the native vegetation of the short-grass plains (c/. Weaver, 1920). Summary of Environment and Crop Development at All Stations, 1920.
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PFA947
. Development and activities of roots of crop plants; a study in crop ecology. Roots (Botany); Plant ecology; Crops and climate. 72 Development and Activities of Roots of Crop Plants. (at 2 to 2.7 feet), gave the plants a root development quite out of proportion to the tops and markedly different from those of more moist soil. This root development agrees with earlier studies of cereal crops, including winter- grown varieties, and in many respects with that of the native vegetation of the short-grass plains (c/. Weaver, 1920). Summary of Environment and Crop Development at All Stations, 1920. The stations at Lincoln, in southeastern Nebraska, Phillipsburg, in north- central Kansas, and Burlington, in eastern Colorado, are at altitudes of 1,100, 1,935, and 4,160 feet respectively. The vegetational expression of the climate at the three stations respectively are true-prairie, mixed-prairie, and short-grass plains. The precipitation for the growing-season, which begins 2 to 4 weeks later at the higher elevation, is shown for each station in figure 32, where the mean precipitation is also included. An examina-. Fiq. 32.—Mean precipitation in inches (black) and precipitation for 1920 at Lincoln (left), Phillipsburg, and Burlington. tion of this figure shows that the rainfall at all stations during March was far below normal, but approximately twice normal during April, when the crops were planted. Aside from a deficiency of nearly half the normal rainfall at Lincoln and Phillipsburg during June, and an increase to twice the normal at the latter station during August, no marked irregularities in the pre- cipitation occurred. The total precipitation at Lincoln during the period was 18.8 inches, which was only 0.3 inch greater than that of Phillipsburg. The precipitation at Burlington was about 75 per cent as great, but owing to numerous light showers and great run-off during heavy ones, its actual effi- ciency in increasing water-content of the soil was probably only hal

Similar stock images