Derelict crushing mill. Silverband Mine, Great Dun Fell, Milburn Forest, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe.

- Image ID: E19CPG
Stan Pritchard / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: E19CPG
Silverband Mines lie at an altitude of about 2,300 ft. on the west side of the ridge of Great Dun Fell, overlooking the Vale of Eden (NGR NY 702 317). In spite of the remote location of the mine, access is comparitively easy by way of a tarmac road from near Knock village which goes to the Ministry of Civil Aviation radar station on the summit of Great Dun Fell: a spur of dry metalled road from a point in Knock Ore Gill contours round to the mines about a mile to the north. The area of the mines lies within the Moor House National Nature Reserve. The mines, worked originally for lead and later for barite extend mainly in an easterly direction below the summit ridge of the Pennines along an east-west vein complex. The Dun Fell Vein and the most productive ground appears to have been in the Great Limestone. The original workings on these veins are of unknown date, but the main exploratory development was done by the London Lead Mining Company during the first half of the nineteenth century. This search for lead was not very successful, but large reerves of barite were revealed. The main working period for the mine was from 1939 to 1962 when B.Laporte and Company extracted nearly 200,000 tons of barite.
Location: Silverband Mine, Great Dun Fell, Milburn Forest, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe.

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