. De re metallica. Metallurgy; Mineral industries. BOOK VI.. K 'i(JIN(i of veins I have vvritti.n of, and the timbering nf shafts, tuinicls, drifts, and otlirr excavations, and tile art uf surveying. I will now speak first of all, of the iron tools with which veins and rocks are broken, tlu'U of tin nf earlh, rock, iiieta buckets into which the lumps , and other excavated materials are thrown, in order that they may be drawn, con- veyed, or carried out. Also, I will speak of the wat(!r vessels and drains, then of the machines of different kinds,' and lastly of the maladies of miners. And while

. De re metallica. Metallurgy; Mineral industries. BOOK VI.. K 'i(JIN(i of veins I have vvritti.n of, and the timbering nf shafts, tuinicls, drifts, and otlirr excavations, and tile art uf surveying. I will now speak first of all, of the iron tools with which veins and rocks are broken, tlu'U of tin nf earlh, rock, iiieta buckets into which the lumps , and other excavated materials are thrown, in order that they may be drawn, con- veyed, or carried out. Also, I will speak of the wat(!r vessels and drains, then of the machines of different kinds,' and lastly of the maladies of miners. And while Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

PFC73T

File size:

7.2 MB (340.7 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1561 x 1601 px | 26.4 x 27.1 cm | 10.4 x 10.7 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. De re metallica. Metallurgy; Mineral industries. BOOK VI.. K 'i(JIN(i of veins I have vvritti.n of, and the timbering nf shafts, tuinicls, drifts, and otlirr excavations, and tile art uf surveying. I will now speak first of all, of the iron tools with which veins and rocks are broken, tlu'U of tin nf earlh, rock, iiieta buckets into which the lumps , and other excavated materials are thrown, in order that they may be drawn, con- veyed, or carried out. Also, I will speak of the wat(!r vessels and drains, then of the machines of different kinds,' and lastly of the maladies of miners. And while all these matters are being described accurately, many methods of work will be explained. There are certain iron tools which the miners designate by names of their own, and besides these, there are wedges, iron blocks, iron plates, hammers, crowbars, pikes, picks, hoes, and shovels. Of those which are especially referred to as " iron tools " there are four varieties, which are different from one another in length or thickness, but not in shape, for the upper end of all of them is broad and square, so that it can be struck by the ijliis Book is devoted in the main to winding, ventilating, and pumping machinery. Their mechanical principles are very old. The block and pulley, the windlass, the use of water-wheels, the transmission of power through shafts and gear-wheels, chain-pumps, piston-pumps with valves, were all known to the Greeks and Romans, and possibly earlier. Machines involving these principles were described by Ctesibius, an Alexandrian of 250 B.C., by Archimedes (287-212 B.C.), andby Vitruvius (ist Cciitury B.C.) As to how far these machines were applied to mining by the Ancients we have but little evidence, and this largely in con- nection with handling water. Diodorus Siculus (ist Century B.C.) referring to the Spanish mines, saj's (Book V.) : " Sometimes at great depths they meet great rivers underground, " but by art give check to the violenc

Search stock photos by tags