Cyclopedia universal history : embracing the most complete and recent presentation of the subject in two principal parts or divisions of more than six thousand pages . in every fea-ture. It is not intended in this place tosketch the character of the Indie mindand philosophy, except in so far as thesame may have appeared in its most rudi-mentary stages. The present chapteris devoted to the primitive conditionof the race as it is revealed to us inits earliest aspects and conditions. Letus, then, proceed to note as much asmay be au.thentically gathered of theprimitive condition of these old peopl

Cyclopedia universal history : embracing the most complete and recent presentation of the subject in two principal parts or divisions of more than six thousand pages . in every fea-ture. It is not intended in this place tosketch the character of the Indie mindand philosophy, except in so far as thesame may have appeared in its most rudi-mentary stages. The present chapteris devoted to the primitive conditionof the race as it is revealed to us inits earliest aspects and conditions. Letus, then, proceed to note as much asmay be au.thentically gathered of theprimitive condition of these old peopl Stock Photo
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Cyclopedia universal history : embracing the most complete and recent presentation of the subject in two principal parts or divisions of more than six thousand pages . in every fea-ture. It is not intended in this place tosketch the character of the Indie mindand philosophy, except in so far as thesame may have appeared in its most rudi-mentary stages. The present chapteris devoted to the primitive conditionof the race as it is revealed to us inits earliest aspects and conditions. Letus, then, proceed to note as much asmay be au.thentically gathered of theprimitive condition of these old peoplesof the Indian valleys. On their reaching the regions whichthey were to inhabit, the Aryan folkfrom the northwest found alreadyin the country an aborig- The immigrantinal people which they ^, ^^f-«f, , fhad to crowd out of their country, way. It is not known by how much ag-gression and force these aborigines weredriven from their seats. Nor can it bewell ascertained to what extent the fu-ture race was modified by the absorptionof the primitive tribes of the country. I Tlinillf m m i|iii lilfillll Tllll™«i!I|^llllllillllllillll!fflpillIllBllllIllllilillllll!B. 646 GREAT RACES OF MANKIND. Those who have investigated the sub-ject most closely differ in their estimatesof the extent to which the future peopleof India were influenced in their bloodand character by contact with the oldtribes whom they overcame and dispos-sessed of their native seats. Perhapsthe best judgment is that which assignsbut a small modification on account ofthe absorption of characteristics from theprimitive races. The situation, doubt-less, was not very different, in some re-spects, from that which another Aryanpeople, after nearly four thousand years, discovered by their impact on the abo-riginal races of the New World. Thegreat adventurers from Western Europe, precipitating themselves upon the east-ern coasts of North America, settling-there and planting a new civilization, were not greatly modified, eithe

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