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. Cyclopedia of practical floriculture. Floriculture; Flower language. LILY ) OR outdoor culture these bulbs require a good, sandy loam, which should be dug to a depth say of eighteen inches, and well worked; g> ;|,1 I ^llp^V the Japanese, Chinese, and a few other species do best in a clay loam. — ' The bulbs ought to be set five or six inches deep and left undis- turbed for seeral years, as they thrive much better and gie more m. Stable manure, until thoroughly decayed, or any other fermenting materud, is obnoxious to them, but leaf-mold or plenty of good, old cow- anure would be a w hol

. Cyclopedia of practical floriculture. Floriculture; Flower language. LILY ) OR outdoor culture these bulbs require a good, sandy loam, which should be dug to a depth say of eighteen inches, and well worked; g> ;|,1 I ^llp^V the Japanese, Chinese, and a few other species do best in a clay loam. — ' The bulbs ought to be set five or six inches deep and left undis- turbed for seeral years, as they thrive much better and gie more m. Stable manure, until thoroughly decayed, or any other fermenting materud, is obnoxious to them, but leaf-mold or plenty of good, old cow- anure would be a w hol Stock Photo
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. Cyclopedia of practical floriculture. Floriculture; Flower language. LILY ) OR outdoor culture these bulbs require a good, sandy loam, which should be dug to a depth say of eighteen inches, and well worked; g> ;|,1 I ^llp^V the Japanese, Chinese, and a few other species do best in a clay loam. — ' The bulbs ought to be set five or six inches deep and left undis- turbed for seeral years, as they thrive much better and gie more m. Stable manure, until thoroughly decayed, or any other fermenting materud, is obnoxious to them, but leaf-mold or plenty of good, old cow- anure would be a w holcsomc enrichment. In removing, it is best to keep them the ground as -hort a time as possililc; and if bulbs received from seedsmen ? in a shriveled state, a wrapping of moss, or cotton slightly dampened, for two three'days before planting, would freshen them unless past redemption. Many of the choicer variety of Lilies are grown as house plants in cities by those who have no gardens. A good soil for their growth comprises equal parts of loam and peat, or leaf- •^fc=- I. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Turner, Cordelia Harris. New York, T. MacCoun