Alamy logo

. Culture of the grasses. Grasses. CULTURE OP THE GRASSES.. Fig. 5. Rcdtop. Fig. 6. English Bent. New York and New England it is known by a great variety of names, and assumes a great variety of forms, according to the soil ill which it grows. It is well adapted to almost every soil, though it seems to prefer a moist loam. It makes a profitable crop for spending, in the form of hay, though its yield is less than that of Timothy. It is well suited to our permanent pastures, where it should be fed. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally

. Culture of the grasses. Grasses. CULTURE OP THE GRASSES.. Fig. 5. Rcdtop. Fig. 6. English Bent. New York and New England it is known by a great variety of names, and assumes a great variety of forms, according to the soil ill which it grows. It is well adapted to almost every soil, though it seems to prefer a moist loam. It makes a profitable crop for spending, in the form of hay, though its yield is less than that of Timothy. It is well suited to our permanent pastures, where it should be fed. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally  Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

PFWN78

File size:

7.1 MB (0.4 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1305 x 1915 px | 22.1 x 32.4 cm | 8.7 x 12.8 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. Culture of the grasses. Grasses. CULTURE OP THE GRASSES.. Fig. 5. Rcdtop. Fig. 6. English Bent. New York and New England it is known by a great variety of names, and assumes a great variety of forms, according to the soil ill which it grows. It is well adapted to almost every soil, though it seems to prefer a moist loam. It makes a profitable crop for spending, in the form of hay, though its yield is less than that of Timothy. It is well suited to our permanent pastures, where it should be fed. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Flint, Charles Louis, 1824-1889; Massachusetts. State Board of Agriculture. Boston, W. White, printer to the state