. Compendium of meteorology. Meteorology. Fig. 2.âSeasonal density variations from photographic meteors. groups among the meteors exhibit the same correlation. A least-square solution shows that logio p increases 0.019 ± 0.0013 (P.E.) per degree centigrade of ground temperature. This result applies at a mean height of 78 km. The total seasonal range would be 0.46 in logw p, corresponding to a height variation of 8.6 km. The seasonal correlation is less marked when the solar declination is used in place of the ground temper- ature. The correlation is not improved by comparison with the actual

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. Compendium of meteorology. Meteorology. Fig. 2.âSeasonal density variations from photographic meteors. groups among the meteors exhibit the same correlation. A least-square solution shows that logio p increases 0.019 ± 0.0013 (P.E.) per degree centigrade of ground temperature. This result applies at a mean height of 78 km. The total seasonal range would be 0.46 in logw p, corresponding to a height variation of 8.6 km. The seasonal correlation is less marked when the solar declination is used in place of the ground temper- ature. The correlation is not improved by comparison with the actual  Stock Photo
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. Compendium of meteorology. Meteorology. Fig. 2.âSeasonal density variations from photographic meteors. groups among the meteors exhibit the same correlation. A least-square solution shows that logio p increases 0.019 ± 0.0013 (P.E.) per degree centigrade of ground temperature. This result applies at a mean height of 78 km. The total seasonal range would be 0.46 in logw p, corresponding to a height variation of 8.6 km. The seasonal correlation is less marked when the solar declination is used in place of the ground temper- ature. The correlation is not improved by comparison with the actual
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. Compendium of meteorology. Meteorology. Fig. 2.âSeasonal density variations from photographic meteors. groups among the meteors exhibit the same correlation. A least-square solution shows that logio p increases 0.019 ± 0.0013 (P.E.) per degree centigrade of ground temperature. This result applies at a mean height of 78 km. The total seasonal range would be 0.46 in logw p, corresponding to a height variation of 8.6 km. The seasonal correlation is less marked when the solar declination is used in place of the ground temper- ature. The correlation is not improved by comparison with the actual ground temperature at the date rather than the general average; hence, the correlation is truly a seasonal one which does not measure local variations. No effects associated with synoptic weather fronts, deviant temperatures in the lower stratosphere, sunspot numbers, lunar-hour angle or solar-hour angle ^re conspicuous. From further meteor investigations, including also atmospheric data from the beginning and end points of photographic meteors, Jacchia [36J finds evidence that the seasonal effect deci'eases with increas- ing height, becoming small and uncertain around the 100-km level. Combining the photographic meteor data from de- celerations and beginning-point data, Jacchia [36] has derived the upper-atmospheric density distribution given in Table I. Heights are given in kilometers above sea level and density in grams per cubic centimeter. The deviations of logio p from the N.A.C.A. Tentative Atmosphere are given in the third column; the N.A.C.A. values have been adjusted slightly to avoid discontinu- ities in the temperature gradient, which are awkward physically. The values of atmospheric temperature in Table I are calculated with a constant molecular weight but include the decrease of gravity with height. The temperatures may be varied greatly within the range of solution, particularly the minimum values near 83 km and the values above 100 km. The observational basis