. Comparative zoology, structural and systematic. For use in schools and colleges. Zoology. 158 COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY. means of an elastic skin connecting the shoulder and wrist, which is stretched when the wing is expanded.. Fis. 124 ^Flamingoes taking Wing. Besides Insects and Birds, a few other animals have the power of flight, as Bats, by means of long webbed fingers; Flying Fishes, by large pectoral fins; and Flying Reptiles, Flying Squirrels, and the like, by membranes between the foi-e and hind legs. (3) Locomotion on Solids. — This requires less muscular effort than swimming or flying. T

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. Comparative zoology, structural and systematic. For use in schools and colleges. Zoology. 158 COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY. means of an elastic skin connecting the shoulder and wrist, which is stretched when the wing is expanded.. Fis. 124 ^Flamingoes taking Wing. Besides Insects and Birds, a few other animals have the power of flight, as Bats, by means of long webbed fingers; Flying Fishes, by large pectoral fins; and Flying Reptiles, Flying Squirrels, and the like, by membranes between the foi-e and hind legs. (3) Locomotion on Solids. — This requires less muscular effort than swimming or flying. T
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Image ID: REERB2
. Comparative zoology, structural and systematic. For use in schools and colleges. Zoology. 158 COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY. means of an elastic skin connecting the shoulder and wrist, which is stretched when the wing is expanded.. Fis. 124 ^Flamingoes taking Wing. Besides Insects and Birds, a few other animals have the power of flight, as Bats, by means of long webbed fingers; Flying Fishes, by large pectoral fins; and Flying Reptiles, Flying Squirrels, and the like, by membranes between the foi-e and hind legs. (3) Locomotion on Solids. — This requires less muscular effort than swimming or flying. The more unyielding the basis of support, the greater the amount of force left to move the animal along. The simplest method is the suctorial, the animal attaching itself to some fixed object, and then, by contraction, dragging tlie body onward. But the higher and more common method is by the use of bones, or other hard parts, as levers. The Star-fish creeps by the working of hundreds of tubular suckers, which are extended by being filled with fluid forced into them by little sacs. The Clam moves by fixing and contracting a muscular appendage, called a "foot." The Snail has innumerable short muscles on the under side of its body, which, by successive contrac- tions resembling minute undulations, enable the animal to glide forward apparently without effort. The Leech. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Orton, James, 1830-1877. New York, Harper and brothers

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